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Research

Research News

Our faculty and students are engaged in important research seeking to solve the world’s most pressing problems. Each year, faculty and students make important contributions to the field which result in them participating in a wide-range of research projects, publishing peer-reviewed articles, and presenting important findings at conferences.


Research Office Newsletter – September 2021

Click here to read the College of Social Work’s quarterly Research Office Newsletter

Date: September 2021


Dr. Shannon Jarrott Receives USDA Grant!

Congratulations to Dr. Shannon Jarrott!

Dr. Jarrott recently received a USDA grant entitled, “Building Relationships Intergenerationally through Guided Mentoring – BRIDGE2Health: An intergenerational mentoring program.”

This five-year $1.28M project takes an intergenerational community-based participatory research approach to programming in Cuyahoga County, Ohio and Amherst County, Virginia.

The focal population will be teenagers, approximately half of whom are in foster and kinship (e.g., grandparent) care, and older adult participants, including volunteers affiliated with a local partner. Annual cohorts of paired teen and older adult mentors will engage in a train-the-trainer model by which participants build skills with age peers and then with intergenerational partners before engaging in community outreach.

By engaging teens and older adults as partners in evidence-based curricula to identify needs and assets to which they can jointly respond through bi-directional mentoring, we anticipate achievement of short-term goals that include formation of trusting, supportive relationships, positive social norms, and belonging. Long-term goals include teen skill building and resilience and older adults’ generative achievement. The two communities, working with OSU Extension, and VCE, will have better coordinated, sustainable services reflecting community needs.


Research Brief: Using Social Media Reddit Data to Examine Foster Families’ Concerns and Needs During COVID-19

COVID-19 is likely to have negatively impacted foster families, but few data sources are available to confirm this. The current study used Reddit social media data to examine how foster families were faring in the early months of the pandemic. Click here to view a PDF with full details.


PhD Candidate Kathryn Coxe Receives NIH F31 Fellowship

Congratulations to PhD candidate Kathryn Coxe!

Kathryn recently received an NIH F31 predoctoral fellowship for her grant, “Implementation of Traumatic Brain Injury Screening in Behavioral Healthcare Organizations.”

This fellowship is through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and will support Kathryn as she carries out her dissertation research. It also supports two years of ongoing mentored training that will be focused on implementation science and traumatic brain injury interventions. Kathryn’s research will investigate whether provider-level characteristics and innovation-level factors affect traumatic brain injury (TBI) screening adoption in behavioral healthcare contexts to inform implementation strategies aimed to increase TBI screening adoption in behavioral healthcare.

To share a little more about the significance of this award, to our knowledge Kathryn is the first ever doctoral student to submit and receive an F31 in this history of the college. Within NINDS, this is also one of few grants awarded to a social scientist (most focus on neuroscience and basic sciences​). These are incredibly competitive and prestigious awards that signify strong potential for an NIH-funded research career.


Dr. Nancy Mendoza Receives NIDCD Award Funding

Congratulations to Dr. Nancy Mendoza!

She recently received a National on Deafness and Other Communication (NIDCD) diversity supplement for parent award, “SES-Related Disparities in Early Language Development and Child Risk for Developmental Language Disorder,” with funding just under $200,000!

The two-year project will focus on understanding how the COVID-19 crisis, and related changes in caregiver distress and interactions with infants, affects infant language development over a 12-month period.

Innovative aspects of this supplemental grant include collecting multiple caregiver-infant interactions, including secondary caregiver-infant interactions, and using smartphone technology to conduct in-home assessments among vulnerable groups who are often left out of digital data collection studies, including COVID-19 studies. This supplemental award will provide Nancy the opportunity to be part of an experienced research team under the mentorship of Dr. Laura Justice, OSU College of Education and Human Ecology.


Research Office Newsletter – June 2021

Click here to read the College of Social Work’s quarterly Research Office Newsletter

Date: June 2021


Dr. Camille R. Quinn’s Research, Community Engagement Hits Mark

Congratulations to Dr. Camille R. Quinn who is celebrating an impressive amount of research much of which impacts African American youth. Her work has also been picked up by a variety of news outlets and websites from around the country. See below for highlights and links.

Recent research from Quinn’s reveals that:
• Caregivers’ trauma may filter down to younger generations and specifically trigger PTSD among Black girls in the juvenile justice system. Read more.
• Black teens and young adults living in public housing are a “hidden population” when it comes to suicide prevention efforts. Read more.

Additionally, just a remarkable, Dr. Quinn:
• Was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Juvenile Justice. Her term began on January 29, 2021, and will end on October 31, 2023.
• Provided written testimony in support of SB256, which passed.
• Moderated and shared remarks during a live, national virtual session on Girls in the Juvenile Justice System called “Conversations on the Road to Unlocked” in May prior to the “Unlocked” national conference in October 2021 in Philadelphia, PA.
• Worked with CSW PhD candidates Oliver Beer and Rebecca Phillips to publish an article examining stress, coping strategies and health outcomes among social workers in Ohio. Read more.
• Hosted “Do More, Do It Now,” a presentation focused on Black girls and young women in the juvenile justice system and part of the Kirwan Institute’s bi-weekly forum series.
Link: https://bit.ly/2MZ1ld7
• Served on a special panel of experts discussing the HBO documentary, “True Justice,” which highlights the work of Bryan Stevenson and the Equal Justice Initiative.

For more information on Quinn, click here.


Social Work Establishes Age-Friendly Innovation Center

The College of Social Work is pleased to announce its new Age-Friendly Innovation Center (AFIC).

The mission of AFIC is to innovate with older adults through research, education and engagement to ensure inclusion and build resiliency to make communities more age-friendly. This will be achieved through collaborating with Ohio State interdisciplinary faculty, students and community partners.

Building off five years of progress, the AFIC will continue to prioritize the contributions of older residents to improve social, built and health environments that support livability for people of all ages and abilities. The new center will be located at Rev1 Labs, 1275 Kinnear Road and will be celebrated in an upcoming event.

For more information about the work of age-friendly, click here or contact Director Katie White at white.3073@osu.edu


Research Brief: An Assessment of the Role of Parental Incarceration and Substance Misuse in Suicidal Planning of African American Youth and Young Adults

African American youth have the highest suicide death rate increase among any other racial/ethnic minority group, from 2.55 per 100,000 in 2007 to 4.82 per 100,000 in 2017, and are becoming the group most likely to die by suicide in the United States. Guided by ecodevelopmental theory, we investigated the relationship between parental incarceration and substance misuse and their association with suicidal planning in a sample of African American youth and young adults. Click here to view a PDF with full details.


Dr. Alan Davis Publishes New Research Highlighting the Impact of Psychedelic Drugs on Trauma,Therapy  

Congratulations to Dr. Alan Davis whose recently published research shows the impact psychedelic drugs may have in several areas.

Who may benefit most from psychedelics used in therapy?

In March, Davis published research showing that patients who are open to new experiences and willing to surrender to the unknown may benefit most from psychedelics used as therapy for mental health disorders. The study can be viewed online in the journal ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science.

To read the complete press release, click here.

Davis’ research was picked up by multiple news sources including News Medical, Science Daily, Medical Xpress, Mirage News and Newswise.

One psychedelic experience may lessen trauma of racial injustice

Late last year, Davis’ also published new research showing that just one positive experience on a psychedelic drug may help reduce the lasting trauma of racial injustice in Black, Indigenous and people of color. The study can be viewed online in the journal Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy.

To read the press release, click here.

Davis’ research was picked up in several news sources including The New York Post, Whole Foods, ANI: South Asia’s leading multimedia news agency reaching Canada and India, Yahoo!, British news outlet DailyMail.com and The College Fix.

To learn more about Davis, click here.