Category Archives: Uncategorized

Congratulations to alumna Maggie Griffin (BSSW ’17, pictured right) who was featured in a public service announcement during the November 4, Ohio State vs. Iowa game.

Griffin was an inaugural winner of the President’s Prize, an Ohio State social change initiative funded by President Michael Drake. Maggie collaborated with her faculty mentor, Dr. Michelle Kaiser, on a project called the “Unity Fridge,” that uses innovative urban gardening to feed people throughout Columbus. If you’d like to learn more, check out her story.

Click here to watch Maggie’s video/PSA.

 

 

 

More than 450 College of Social Work graduates and their families and friends packed out Ohio State’s Mershon Auditorium on Friday, May 5, for the college’s annual Evening of Recognition, an event honoring social work graduates. Momentum soared during the ceremony as students were honored with yellow roses, awards and live tweet shouts and well wishes displayed on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the auditorium stage.

Two days later, the graduates received their degrees during The Ohio State University’s Spring Commencement. A record breaking 11,734 Ohio State students earned degrees and more than half of them participated in the ceremony. Ohio State is one of the few universities where all graduates participate in a single ceremony, and where each graduate gets his or her diploma at the ceremony.

College’s Graduation Ceremony: A Unique Blend of Technology and Tradition

No one wants to miss a loved one’s graduation, but what if you’re on the other side of the country or across the ocean? The College of Social Work solves that problem for those faraway guests wishing to attend its annual  pre-commencement ceremony known as the Evening of Recognition. With a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media, the college streams the event live so guests from all over the United States can watch their graduating family and friends be recognized, receive honors and walk the stage.

This year, the event drew nearly 150 guests. They watched from Argentina and Canada, as well as from 25 states outside of Ohio, including Hawaii. Onlookers, both via the live feed and in person, were invited to tweet shout outs and well wishes to the graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage in Mershon Auditorium on Ohio State’s campus. Just as in years past, the event went viral on Twitter.

The college, known for being technology-forward, added live streaming and tweeting during the ceremony several years ago.  The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!” is a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

Watch this traditional, cutting-edge way of celebrating College of Social Work graduates.

Helm, Kreinbrink Honored at College Award Ceremony

At this year’s 2017 Field Education Appreciation Breakfast, Linda Helm, MSW, PhD, LISW-S, ACSW, was selected as Field Liaison of the Year. Helm serves as the college’s program manager for the University Partnership Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program. She was nominated by Morgan Johnson and Sarah McGee.

Additionally, Jenny Kreinbrink, MSW, LSW, was selected as Co-Instructor of the Year. Jenny serves as a field coordinator at the college. She was nominated by Elizabeth Fries.

 

 

Kelley Cupp Named Staff Member of the Year
Kelley Cupp is this year’s recipient of the Dianna Barrett Outstanding Staff Member Award, which recognizes staff members who have displayed exemplary service to the college, its students and faculty. Candidates for the award are nominated by college faculty or staff, and the recipient is determined by the dean.  As an educational technologist, Kelley has had a very important role in the development of the college’s highly successful online curriculum. She has been key in helping our online instruction reach such a high level of excellence.

 

Yoon Receives Honorable Mention for SSWR Dissertation
Dr. Susan Yoon’s dissertation earned Honorable Mention from the Society for Social Work and Research. Her dissertation is entitled “Fostering Resilient Development: Risk and Protective Factors Underlying Behavioral Trajectories of Maltreated Children.” To learn more about Yoon, click here.

Congratulations to Dr. Sharvari Karandikar who received The Ohio State University’s Outstanding Advisor Award from the Office of Student Life. Karandikar was honored with this award in acknowledgement of her exceptional leadership for Sankalpa, a registered Ohio State student organization. She has gone above and beyond her duties as an advisor and has helped facilitate growth and development in the group’s members.

At the college, Karandikar serves as an associate professor. She began her career practicing as a social worker for sex workers and victims of sex trafficking in Mumbai, India. During her PhD program in Social Work at University of Utah, and through her work at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in Mumbai and later at the Ohio State University, she has focused her research efforts on issues related to the female sex workers and victims of sex trafficking particularly on gender-based violence, health and mental health issues. Karandikar’s current research relates to sex work and sex trafficking in Asia, egg donation, international gestational surrogacy, medical tourism and its impact on women.

For more information about Karandikar, click here.

Dr. Michelle Kaiser and Nicholas Stanich

Congratulations to Dr. Michelle Kaiser! She is the 2017 recipient of the Emerging Service-Learning Award for her “Follow the Tomato” course.

The “Follow the Tomato: Community-Based Food Strategies to Address Social and Environmental Injustices” course was also featured in the Association of Public & Land Grant Universities (APLU) Challenge of Change report on page 117. The report focuses on the effort to solve global food and nutrition security challenges.  For more background about the challenge and Ohio State’s involvement, click here.

Special thanks to Dr. Vicki Fitts who helped co-teach the course for two years.

Franklinton Gardens was also selected to receive OSU’s 2017 Excellence in Community Partnership Award. Special thanks to Kaiser and Nicholas Stanich, Director of Franklin Gardens, for their work there.

Last year, Kaiser was honored with The Ohio State University’s highest teaching award, the 2016 Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching. She was chosen out of more than 3,000 Ohio State faculty.

For more information about Kaiser and her work, visit:

Alumni Magazine Feature

Faculty Page

MichelleKaiserlowresWhy should where you live determine how long you live? That’s one of the food security issues Dr. Michelle Kaiser addresses in the Ohio State Alumni Magazine’s July/August issue featuring a special report on food security.

Click here to check out her story. Also read the entire special report.

Kaiser was recently honored with The Ohio State University’s highest teaching award, the 2016 Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching. She was chosen out of more than 3,000 Ohio State faculty.

No one wants to miss a loved one’s graduation, but what if you’re on the other side of the country or across the ocean?

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The Ohio State University College of Social Work solved that problem for those faraway guests wishing to attend its annual pre-commencement ceremony known as the Evening of Recognition. More than 60 guests from all over the United States—17 states to be exact and as far away as Hawaii—streamed live to watch their graduating family and friends recognized, receive honors and walk the stage. In all, about 412 students receiving BSSW, MSW and PhD degrees were recognized at Mershon Auditorium. Onlookers, both in person and via the live feed, were also invited to tweet shout outs and well wishes to the graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage.

The college, known for being technology-forward, added live streaming and tweeting during the ceremony several years ago. The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!,” was a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

To watch the ceremony, click here.

BEGUN AUDREY

Dr. Audrey Begun

Congratulations to Dr. Audrey Begun who became a Fellow of the Society for Social Work and Research this year. Begun became a fellow during an induction ceremony at the society’s annual conference in Washington, D.C. in January. She joins Dr. Natasha Bowen as Ohio State’s and the College of Social Work’s  two faculty members inducted into the Society for Social Work and Research as a SSWR Fellow.  Induction into the fellowship is a prestigious acknowledgment that is awarded to a very limited number of the SSWR membership.

College of Social Work 304

Dr. Natasha Bowen

According to SSWR: “Fellows of the Society for Social Work and Research are members who have served with distinction to advance the mission of the Society — to advance, disseminate, and translate research that addresses issues of social work practice and policy and promotes a diverse, equitable and just society.”

Begun’s research, service, and leadership in SSWR has focused on substance misuse and addictive behaviors. She has presented work in the past on training social workers about alcohol use disorders and preventing violence against women. To read more about Begun, click here.
Bowen does research on how elementary and middle schools can reduce academic achievement disparities associated with race/ethnicity and socio-economic status.  To read more about Bowen, click here.

MEETING THE CHALLENGE

Why, after decades of research and effort on so many fronts, does the scourge of alcohol misuse remain entrenched in society?

BEGUN-AUDREY

Begun

For Drs. Audrey Begun and John Clapp of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, and 31 of their colleagues, what’s needed is a vision as vast as the problem. What’s needed is a unified, concerted strategy that employs the best minds and most effective weapons from multiple disciplines, a plan founded on the latest research and best practices from the fields of social work, biology, medicine, psychology, public health, economics, engineering and geography, among others.

The vision, outlined in a concept paper first-authored by Begun and Clapp, has been accepted by the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW) as part of its inaugural Grand Challenges for Social Work Initiative. Titled “Reducing and Preventing Negative Consequences of Alcohol Misuse,” the paper includes contributions from social work scholars from around the world.

CLAPP-JOHN

Clapp

Contemporary research approaches make it possible to address  increasingly complex problems such as alcohol misuse, the authors note, and emerging technology gives contributors the ability to capture new types of data to analyze the problem and offer practical solutions.

The paper, along with other accepted proposals, will be published on the AASWSW website and in other publications. Academy President Richard Barth said members will generate interest among policymakers and potential funders for implementing what has been proposed.

The Grand Challenges initiative, announced in January, seeks to solve the most pressing societal problems through innovations in social work science and practice. Areas identified include ending racial injustice, reducing mass incarceration, stopping family violence and achieving health equity, an area that Begun and Clapp’s paper addresses.

Founded in 2009 by major social work organizations, the AASWSW serves to advance the public good and contribute to a sustainable, equitable and just future—a goal that aligns compellingly with the concept of grand challenges.

How does the environment of a neighborhood and its social cohesion affect the likelihood that a parent will abuse or neglect a child?

For years this has been a burgeoning field of investigation among researchers, and a principal topic of inquiry for Dr. Katie Maguire Jack of The Ohio State University College of Social Work. Now, in a significant shift, the third-year assistant professor is extending her research to an area that’s been mostly overlooked and vastly understudied, but one of potential importance to Ohio and states like it.Katie-Maguire-Jack

Child maltreatment is a serious public health problem in the United States. Kids who are abused or neglected are at greater risk of developmental delays, psychiatric disorders, and aggressive and antisocial behaviors. And as adults, they are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, suffer from depression and take part in criminal activity.

Numerous studies have documented a strong correlation between neighborhood poverty and child maltreatment, but the effects of other variables within a neighborhood –crime, racial makeup, turnover, access to child-care and other services — are less clear. Even less understood still is to what degree social aspects of a neighborhood play a role.

The body of research to date, though abundant, is glaringly narrow in one regard – it focuses almost exclusively on neighborhoods in major cities and urban centers. Research on rural communities has gone begging, though population statistics clearly point to the need.

In Ohio, 22 percent of residents – more than 2.5 million people — live in rural areas, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In Maine and Vermont, more than 61 percent of the population is rural, and by sheer numbers Texas, North Carolina and Pennsylvania have more rural residents than Ohio.

Maguire Jack’s latest study, an examination of parenting and family life in rural Ohio, begins to address this gap in the research.

Working with Dr. Bridget Freisthler of UCLA, Maguire Jack will undertake a pilot survey in Shelby County, on the western edge of the state. Of particular interest is whether the availability of social services and the interaction of neighbors provide any protective effect against child maltreatment. In earlier studies, conducted in urban areas of California and Ohio, Maguire Jack found evidence that suggests they do.

A fundamental challenge in developing the Shelby County study, given its rural setting, was defining the unit of geography to be used, in other words, determining what constitutes a “neighborhood” in an area where houses might be separated by vast distances.

Instead of relying on census tracts or political jurisdictions, common in urban studies, Maguire Jack and Freisthler will concentrate on what they call “personalized neighborhoods.” These are areas in which survey respondents most often travel – for instance, the activity space that includes a person’s job site, physician’s office, friend’s house, grocery store, pharmacy, gym, child-care provider, schools and so on.

As a step toward finalizing the format of the survey, Maguire Jack and Freisthler have created a draft questionnaire that will be distributed to 200 to 500 parents with children 12 and younger. The survey examines topics at both the family and community level, including economic hardship, availability of services, community involvement of parents, their interaction with neighbors, child behavior and discipline, and means of emotional support.

The questionnaire will be distributed in November and December by the Sidney-Shelby County YMCA and will also be available online.

The Shelby County research continues a collaboration between Maguire Jack and Freisthler, who earlier this year published a paper titled “Understanding the Interplay Between Neighborhood Structural Factors, Social Processes, and Alcohol Outlets on Child Physical Abuse.”

Freisthler, a professor at the Luskin School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles, will join the OSU College of Social Work faculty in 2016.

For more information, contact Dr. Katie Maguire Jack at maguirejack.1@osu.edu.