Category Archives: Research News

There is a limited understanding of how diaspora—the movement, migration, or scattering of people away from an established or ancestral homeland—leads to change in home and host societies. The purpose of this study is to explore the lived experiences of the Nepali diaspora at the intersection of migration, immigration policy, and disaster response engagement in the post-earthquake (2015) and the US post-election (2016) context.

Click here to view a PDF with full details.

 

 

 

A report recently released in Washington, D.C., by Generations United and The Eisner Foundation recognized the significant and impressive work of the Champion Intergenerational Enrichment and Education Center (IGC). IGC students, staff and participants are represented in the report, All in Together: Creating Places Where Young and Old Thrive, as well as those from Ohio State, Columbus Early Learning Center, National Church Residences and other intergenerational programs across the nation.
The IGC, established in 2015, is a project supported in part by the College of Social Work. It provides a safe place for older adults to socialize and get medical care and a developmentally rich environment for young children to prepare for school.

The report also highlights findings from a national survey conducted by the College of Social Work’s Dr. Shannon Jarrott and Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny to identify those, like Champion, that operate as intergenerational shared sites where youth and elders receive services and share programming at one location. Across the United States, 105 programs responded, indicating goals of improving attitudes towards youth, elders and other groups, such as disabled persons and immigrants. Programs are challenged to document and communicate their impact, but they pursue intergenerational shared site services to support participants’ development, utilization of local talent, money savings, improvement in workplace climate, and easing of caregiver stress.

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Congratulations to Ashley Bennett (MSW 18) and PhD student Karla Shockley McCarthy (MSW 18) who have developed an Opioid Overdose Family Support Toolkit to help families recognize the signs of trauma in children and how to help them.

This toolkit was developed to address a gap from many practitioners about the lack of resources for families, especially children, who have witnessed or were aware of an overdose by a family member. In support of the toolkit, the students conducted a needs assessment, analyzed the results, and used that information to provide tools to help families who have experienced an opioid overdose.

Two brochures mark the end of this project: The Trauma of Witnessing an Opioid Overdose: How to Help Children, developed by Bennett and Shockley McCarthy, a Narcan Q & A, developed in conjunction with colleagues from the College of Pharmacy, as well as a website with helpful information and resources.

The College of Social Work’s Dr. Bridget Freisthler, professor and associate dean of research, supervised the project.

For more information, contact Frankie Jones-Harris at jones-harris.1@osu.edu or 614-330-2206.

The City of Columbus has always strived to be an open, inclusive, and welcoming city to many New American populations from all over the globe. The New Americans Project was commissioned by the Columbus City Council. The Ohio State University College of Social Work was tasked to conduct an in-depth assessment of needs and capacity of the human service landscape—formal, informal, and volunteer services—available in central Ohio for New Americans to bolster the New Americans Initiative led by the City of Columbus.

In January 2018, the research team released their findings from their assessment and are pleased to share these resources:

 

 

 

Preventing infant mortality is a priority in Ohio. Comprehensive positive youth development strategies that address maternal risk factors are needed, not only to promote better outcomes for adolescent girls but also to impact infant mortality. To continue reading, please click on the image or contact Dawn Anderson-Butcher (anderson-butcher.1@osu.edu).

Enhancing Permanency in Children and Families (EPIC) is a program that uses evidence-based and evidence-informed practices to reduce child abuse and neglect among families involved with the child welfare system who have substance use problems. This program is being developed through a collaboration of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, Fairfield County Job and Family Services, and Pickaway County Job and Family Services.

Click here to view a PDF with full details.

 

Central Ohio’s 65+ population is expected to double in the next 30 years. This poses a great opportunity for the region to provide easy access to services, amenities, and opportunities to ensure we can all thrive as we age. Age-Friendly Columbus is a project to strengthen the quality of life for people of all ages across Franklin County and Central Ohio. After a year-long research and assessment phase and a year-long strategic planning phase, Age-Friendly Columbus is now in the implementation phase to make changes happen in our community. The Ohio State University College of Social Work will act as the administrative arm and collaborative partner for the Age-Friendly Columbus initiative during the 2018-2020 implementation period.

Click here to view a PDF with full details.

Congratulations to Dr. Michelle Kaiser whose research was featured by CBS 10-TV, Sunny 95 radio, and other media and websites recently. Kaiser’s research finds that a third of households – double previous estimates – struggle to get enough food in a Columbus area. Check out the video and other story links.

CBS/WBNS 10-TV

The Columbus Dispatch Story

Sunny 95 radio

Ohio State Research Story

In 2016, Kaiser was honored with The Ohio State University’s highest teaching award, the Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching. She was chosen out of more than 3,000 Ohio State faculty members. Ohio State’s Alumni Magazine also featured Kaiser’s research in a special report on food insecurity. Click here to check out her story. For more information about Kaiser, click here. 

 

 

COLUMBUS, OHIO — The Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce that it has received a $3 million grant to address substance abuse problems in Ohio—one of the largest grants ever awarded in the college’s 100 year history.
Congratulations to Drs. Bridget Freisthler, Katie Maguire-Jack  and Susan Yoon who secured the grant, which is funded by the Children’s Bureau of the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
The grant will support regional partnership intervention activities in Ohio’s Fairfield and Pickaway counties to reduce child abuse and neglect among families who have substance use problems. For Pickaway County, 100 percent of substance-involved families were due to opioid (including heroin) misuse, while 58 percent of all substance-involved cases in Fairfield County involved opioids.
As part of the grant, College of Social Work faculty Freisthler (l), Maguire-Jack (r) and Yoon, along with public child welfare administrators, have selected three strategies for the Enhancing Permanency in Children and Families (EPIC) program. The evidence-based or evidence-informed strategies to be included are: (1) family drug treatment court and medication-assisted treatment; (2) peer recovery supporters; and (3) parenting and support for kinship providers. These interventions are intended to holistically provide supports to families involved in the child welfare system due to substance abuse in order to get parents into treatment and increase permanency and well-being for children.
In addition to the College of Social Work, key partners of the project include Fairfield County Job and Family Services (also called Fairfield County Children Services), Pickaway County Job and Family Services (also called Pickaway County Children Services), Pickaway County Juvenile Court and Prosecutor’s Office, Fairfield County Juvenile Court, Berger Health System, OhioGuidestone and Integrated Services.
“We are very excited about this collaborative opportunity and the funding to implement evidence-based interventions for families affected by opioid use in the child welfare system,” said Professor Bridget Freisthler, College of Social Work project lead. “The effects of the opioid crisis on children whose parents are misusing or abusing substances have often been overlooked as solutions have primarily focused on reducing overdose deaths. This award will provide much-needed financial support for services for these children and families.”
EPIC will involve collaboration with a wide range of family-serving agencies, including, child welfare agencies, substance abuse treatment providers, health and mental health agencies, courts, schools, law enforcement, and other service organizations. These professionals will be cross-trained in order to provide better services across systems that interact with these families. This means that child welfare workers will become more knowledgeable and trauma-informed about substance use issues, the peer recovery supporters will understand the child welfare system and processes, the kinship caregiver supporters will understand both the child welfare system and substance use disorders, and the family drug court coordinators and medication assistance treatment providers will have a thorough understanding of child welfare.
“Pickaway County is very excited to partner with Fairfield County and Ohio State with EPIC,” said Joy Ewing, Director of Pickaway County Job and Family Services. “A significant portion of our child welfare caseload involves substance abuse and this grant will provide much needed resources for those families affected by substance abuse.”
Kristi Burre, Deputy Director of Protective Services at Fairfield County Job and Family Services, added “Children traumatized as a result of their parents’ drug abuse are often the invisible victims of the opioid epidemic. It has had a critical impact on our local protective services and our ability to service and manage co-occurring substance abuse and maltreatment concerns with Fairfield County families.”
The College of Social Work has developed a long-standing and deeply ingrained culture of applied research and scholarship that permeates all aspects of its programs, informs its community service and engagement, and contributes to the greater good of the profession, society and the world. This regional partnership opportunity is reflective of its commitment to working with communities around developing solutions for complex problems.
About the College of Social Work
First accredited in 1919, the College of Social Work is the oldest continuously accredited public social work program in the country. The College–through excellence in teaching, research, and service–prepares leaders who enhance individual and community well-being, celebrate difference, and promote social and economic justice for vulnerable populations. The college fosters social change through collaboration with individuals, families, communities, and other change agents to build strengths and resolve complex individual and social problems. As an internationally recognized college, it builds and applies knowledge that positively impacts Ohio, the nation, and the world. The college’s vision is to “embrace difference, seek justice, and be the change.”

For more information about the grant or for interviews, contact:
• Ohio State College of Social Work: Frankie Jones-Harris, Communications Director, at 614-330-2206 or jones-harris.1@osu.edu.

• Pickaway County Job and Family Services Contact: Nick Tatman, Children Services Administrator, nicholas.tatman@jfs.ohio.gov.

• Fairfield County Job and Family Services Contact: Kristi Burre, Deputy Director for Protective Services, Kristi.Burre@jfs.ohio.gov.