Category Archives: News & Events

Congratulations to Dr. Camille R. Quinn who is celebrating an impressive amount of research much of which impacts African American youth. Her work has also been picked up by a variety of news outlets and websites from around the country. See below for highlights and links.

Recent research from Quinn’s reveals that:
• Caregivers’ trauma may filter down to younger generations and specifically trigger PTSD among Black girls in the juvenile justice system. Read more.
• Black teens and young adults living in public housing are a “hidden population” when it comes to suicide prevention efforts. Read more.

Additionally, just a remarkable, Dr. Quinn:
• Was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Juvenile Justice. Her term began on January 29, 2021, and will end on October 31, 2023.
• Provided written testimony in support of SB256, which passed.
• Moderated and shared remarks during a live, national virtual session on Girls in the Juvenile Justice System called “Conversations on the Road to Unlocked” in May prior to the “Unlocked” national conference in October 2021 in Philadelphia, PA.
• Worked with CSW PhD candidates Oliver Beer and Rebecca Phillips to publish an article examining stress, coping strategies and health outcomes among social workers in Ohio. Read more.
• Hosted “Do More, Do It Now,” a presentation focused on Black girls and young women in the juvenile justice system and part of the Kirwan Institute’s bi-weekly forum series.
Link: https://bit.ly/2MZ1ld7
• Served on a special panel of experts discussing the HBO documentary, “True Justice,” which highlights the work of Bryan Stevenson and the Equal Justice Initiative.

For more information on Quinn, click here.

The College of Social Work is pleased to announce its new Age-Friendly Innovation Center (AFIC).

The mission of AFIC is to innovate with older adults through research, education and engagement to ensure inclusion and build resiliency to make communities more age-friendly. This will be achieved through collaborating with Ohio State interdisciplinary faculty, students and community partners.

Building off five years of progress, the AFIC will continue to prioritize the contributions of older residents to improve social, built and health environments that support livability for people of all ages and abilities. The new center will be located at Rev1 Labs, 1275 Kinnear Road and will be celebrated in an upcoming event.

For more information about the work of age-friendly, click here or contact Director Katie White at white.3073@osu.edu

The Ohio State University College of Social Work is in solidarity with transgender and gender diverse children, adolescents, and adults. As social workers and scholars, we promote social justice for vulnerable populations through high-quality research and evidence-based practice. Read the full statement from the college.

Congratulations to Dr. Alan Davis whose recently published research shows the impact psychedelic drugs may have in several areas.

Who may benefit most from psychedelics used in therapy?

In March, Davis published research showing that patients who are open to new experiences and willing to surrender to the unknown may benefit most from psychedelics used as therapy for mental health disorders. The study can be viewed online in the journal ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science.

To read the complete press release, click here.

Davis’ research was picked up by multiple news sources including News Medical, Science Daily, Medical Xpress, Mirage News and Newswise.

One psychedelic experience may lessen trauma of racial injustice

Late last year, Davis’ also published new research showing that just one positive experience on a psychedelic drug may help reduce the lasting trauma of racial injustice in Black, Indigenous and people of color. The study can be viewed online in the journal Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy.

To read the press release, click here.

Davis’ research was picked up in several news sources including The New York Post, Whole Foods, ANI: South Asia’s leading multimedia news agency reaching Canada and India, Yahoo!, British news outlet DailyMail.com and The College Fix.

To learn more about Davis, click here.

Did you know that March doubles as Social Work Month and Women’s History Month? Celebrate with us as we note just a few of the many contributions of both social workers and women.

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This year, the College of Social Work is celebrating the many products invented or redesigned by Black people. From the dust pan, hair brush and ice cream scooper, to the mailbox, traffic light, and curtain rod, the significant inventions of Black people have impacted the world. Take a look to see what you know and can learn.

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View the slideshow!

As the new year approaches, so does anxiety around what it may hold, especially as we continue to deal with the uncertainty of COVID19, and now the rollout of vaccines.

Will the new year be as disruptive as 2020? When can we stop wearing masks and social distancing? Will jobs return and small businesses rebound? Now add the usual heavy weight of expectations for a new start and unrealistic resolutions, and you’re dealing with even more stress. Whatever the new year ushers in, stress will certainly be on the list.
College of Social Work senior community lecturer Kelley Breidigan, MSW, LISW-S (MSW ’09), spoke with The Columbus Dispatch and ABC6-TV about ways to cope with both New Year’s and holiday stress. Breidigan has nine years of undergraduate and graduate classroom experience and is a seasoned mental health professional.

Read the story.

Listen here.

You won’t want to miss the college’s new Social Change podcast spinoff, Bry & Bold, dedicated to amplifying community voices, issues and conversations that need to be heard. Host Bryanna Stigger (left) discusses with Dr. Camille R. Quinn the importance of allyship, what being an ally really means, concepts of equity, and much more during this podcast premiere. Stigger serves as the college’s MSW outreach program coordinator.

Listen HERE and watch for more podcasts coming your way soon!

For previous Social Change podcasts, click here.

Just about everything has changed with COVID-19—even the way you get your CSW alumni magazine, The Stillman!

Click here for a PDF.

Click here to visit the web page.

Issue highlights include:
• A curriculum reformed
• Social work dean chairs university task force
• NASW leads a profession
• Stepping up and out during chaos
• How are parents coping during COVID-19?

Congratulations to Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny who recently made two splashes in the media. Dabelko-Schoeny was featured on WOSU/NPR’s All Sides with Ann Fisher radio show discussing issues related to aging, ageism and how that is reflected in policymaking. Her team-written, op-ed piece was also published in the Star Tribune, identifying Adult Day Service as essential and in crisis.

Missed the show? Click here.
Interested in reading the column? Click here.
Learn more about Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny here.

Chris and Preston McMurryThe Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce the establishment of the Donna Theresa and Preston V. McMurry Jr. Scholarship Fund, effective February 2020. The scholarship supports social work students who make a commitment to support survivors of domestic violence. The first scholarship was awarded this spring to MSW student Lucy Hennon for the 2020–21 academic year.

“I plan to use my coursework and training to further educate myself on direct support for victims and survivors through inclusive, trauma-informed and survivor-led approaches,” says Hennon. “I feel immensely privileged and fortunate to be selected as a scholarship recipient and want to express my gratitude and excitement to Preston McMurry, Jr. and the College of Social Work.”

McMurry (BSSW ’60) established the Donna Theresa and Preston McMurry, Jr. Scholarship Fund to create an immediate impact on furthering the pool of social workers who commit to working in the field of domestic violence by supporting their education.

Endowing this scholarship is McMurry’s latest investment in responding to domestic violence and is the product of his decades long commitment to survivors of violence.

In 1992, McMurry established Theresa’s Fund, a private family foundation that has raised over $49,000,000 to combat child abuse and family violence in Arizona. In August 2014, Preston and his son, Chris, launched DomesticShelters.org, an innovative and comprehensive online platform focused on persons threatened by family violence and those who are supporting them. As the first searchable online database of resources for persons experiencing domestic violence, DomesticShelters.org has had a profound impact. The website now averages 3,000,000 visits annually and has a wealth of resources and support. The College of Social Work is highly supportive of DomesticShelters.org and will continue to partner with the McMurrys to further engage its faculty and students, and to help advance the impact of the important program.

“My father started his work on domestic violence by creating Theresa’s Fund around 1990, almost three decades ago, when domestic violence wasn’t yet a public conversation,” says Chris. “He’s always sought innovative ideas that mix raising awareness with his soft spot for young people and successful futures.”

Domestic violence is often a silent problem. Victims are fearful of retribution and experience shame and embarrassment due to their situation, all of which makes it difficult to seek help. During the current COVID-19 crisis, reports of domestic violence to public safety officials has sky-rocketed as has the number of visits to domestic violence websites and calls to hotlines. Stay-at-home orders, economic losses and other factors lead to increased stress and sometimes additional violence. As the world continues to enter circumstances it has never before experienced, new spikes in domestic violence may likely continue.

Preston McMurry, of Phoenix, is also founder of the McMurry Scholar Athlete Citizenship Award, which started in 2008 to honor student-athletes with a minimum 3.0 GPA and who performed significant community service. He made his first substantial philanthropic commitment to the college in 2008.

In 1984, he created one of the largest privately owned marketing firms in the nation, McMurry, Inc.—the only company in the U.S. to be selected by the San Francisco-based Great Place to Work Institute, as one of the ten best places to work, eight years in a row.

In reflecting upon this gift and McMurry’s career, Dean Tom Gregoire observed, “I have great affection and gratitude for Preston McMurry, and I consider him a friend and a mentor. Preston’s entire career has been informed by a deep commitment to values we hold dear as social workers, and to action on behalf of others.”

Congratulations U.S. Marine Corps veteran and BSSW student Tom Wike who has been named a 2020 Tillman Military Scholar. Wike is a senior with plans to earn his MSW. He is one of 60 scholars selected from thousands of applicants by the Pat Tillman Foundation for the prestigious award.
In recognition of their service and leadership potential, the new class of Tillman Scholars will receive scholarship funding to pursue higher education and continue their service in the fields of healthcare, business, law, public service, STEM, education and the humanities.

Read more about Wike here.

Click here for the news release.

More than 5,100 people tuned into the College of Social Work’s first virtual celebration of its 2020 graduates on Friday, May 8, at 6 p.m. The Evening of Recognition was live-streamed and interactive, including live tweets to and from students, families, friends, college staff and faculty as well a message from Dean Tom Gregoire.

From Germany to Egypt, and as far away as Pakistan to India, people from all over the world including the United States watched and participated by sending 2020 CSW graduates off in grand style. A record number of more than 600 people remarked and sent well wishes via Twitter, along with another 1,000 reactions, including likes, hearts, cares and more.

Solving the distance problem is nothing new for the college. For years, it has allowed loved ones from across the country or ocean join the on-campus graduation celebration via live stream and Twitter. This year, it applied learned lessons and adhered to social distancing guidelines to host this special event for its graduates and their families.

Background: The college is known for its live-streamed graduation ceremony allowing faraway guests from all over the United States and world to watch their graduating family and friends be recognized, receive honors and walk the stage. Previously, onlookers, both via a live feed and in person, tweeted shout outs and well wishes to graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage in Mershon Auditorium on Ohio State’s campus.

The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!” is a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

To view this year’s virtual Evening of Recognition, click here.

To assist isolated older adults, the College of Social Work’s Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County initiative is partnering with Columbus City Council, the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resource Center and other local organizations to establish the new Friendly Phone Line.

The Friendly Phone Line at 614/993-3614 is created for older adults in greater Columbus who are looking for informal conversation and social connection. It is staffed by social work students, staff and faculty volunteers.

The partnership also launched a program that packs and delivers 200 necessity bags each week to older adults across Franklin County. Bags contain three-to-five days’ worth of shelf stable food, dependent upon availability through the Mid-Ohio Foodbank, as well as other necessities like soap, shampoo and toilet paper. Educational materials, such as Files of Life (a list of contact information used in emergencies), community resources, notes of encouragement and Census 2020 information, are included in the bags as well.

Click here to learn about resources for older adults.

Congratulations to Dr. Shannon Jarrott on two recent accomplishments impacting intergenerational research and programs.

Generations United has released a new publication that includes partners Jarrott, the Champion Intergenerational Center and The Eisner Foundation. It is entitled “Piecing It Together: What We Know About the Funding Puzzle for Spaces that Connect Young and Old.”

Jarrott has also partnered with Generations United and The Eisner Foundation to release a new Intergenerational Evaluation Toolkit. A compilation of 15 years of collaborative research, the toolkit offers resources to help program providers and researchers impact intergenerational programing and practices. To view the toolkit, click here.

Also supporting intergenerational research, Jarrott is collaborating with faculty at Oregon State University to develop a measure of intergenerational contact. The study is supported by a grant from The Retirement Research Foundation.

For more information about Dr. Jarrott, click here.

For more information on the Champion Intergenerational Center, click here.

Congrats to LiFEsports! The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is highlighting LiFEsports in its National Youth Sports Strategy report. The initiative is featured on pages 32-33.

To read the report, click here.

For more information about LiFEsports, click here.

Congratulations to Dr. Alicia Bunger whose R34 “Collaborating to Implement Cross-System Interventions in Child Welfare and Substance Use” was recently funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This is Bunger’s first NIH R award.
This three-year project, with a total funding of over $700,000, will examine implementation of Ohio START in the initial 17 counties. The study focuses on cross-system collaboration strategies, and the conditions under which they are most effective for implementing the START model, an intervention that integrates substance use treatment and child welfare systems to facilitate parents’ access to treatment and recovery. The team will develop and pilot a collaboration decision-support guide for executive leaders.
The project is being carried out in partnership with the Public Children Services Association of Ohio (PCSAO). The interdisciplinary team includes Drs. Emmeline Chuang (UCLA Fielding School of Public Health), Amanda Girth (OSU Glenn College) and Kathryn Lancaster (OSU College of Public Health).

For more information about Bunger, click here.

As part of a new program in a partnership between The Ohio State University and Honda R&D Americas, Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny will lead a project to create a monthly user group of older adults and individuals with disabilities to test, review and provide recommendations to enhance future mobility products and services. The project will be led by an interdisciplinary team of faculty, students and community members and will be digitally documented through branded storytelling. The goal of the new partnership is to nurture innovative ideas to help make transportation easier, safer and more environmentally friendly.  Read more.

The College of Social Work is pleased to announce its involvement in a new Ohio initiative that aims to reduce opioid overdose deaths by 40 percent in 19 Ohio counties, including nine rural counties, six of which are in Appalachia.

The new initiative, part of the federal HEALing Communities Study, will use real-time research to focus prevention, treatment and recovery programs in the state, which has been hit especially hard by opioid deaths.The study is a $350 million investment by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); its HEAL (Helping to End Addiction Long-term) initiative is designed to reduce overdose deaths by 40 percent in participating communities.

In total, Ohio will receive $65.9 million federal research grant dollars to address the opioid epidemic and implement interventions, headed by The Ohio State University, and including a consortium of academic, state and community partners.

The college’s Dr. Bridget Freisthler, professor and associate dean for research and faculty development, will lead the initiative’s Community Engagement core, along with the College of Public Health’s Dr. Pamela Salsberry, professor and associate dean for community outreach and engagement. Embedded in their work is the perspective that communities are the experts of their local environment. Freisthler and Salsberry will work with communities to identify and implement evidence-based interventions that will be most likely to reduce opioid overdose deaths given their local context, determine ways to strengthen connections of agencies involved in local coalitions, and work with communities to try and reduce stigma related to addiction and treatment.

“This is a real opportunity for Ohio to reverse the entrenched problem of opioid misuse and overdoses while drawing on the strengths and resources of local communities,” says Freisthler. “By providing counties with the much needed training, technical assistance and funding to implement evidence-based interventions, we hope to bring solutions to the many families affected by this epidemic.”

For more information, click here.

For an interview with Freisthler, contact Frankie Jones-Harris, Communications Director, at 614/330-2206 or jones-harris.1@osu.edu.

 

The Ohio State University College of Social Work’s graduate program is celebrating another milestone as it climbs in the U.S. News & World Report’s rankings of America’s Best Graduate Schools. In the 2020 rankings, the college advanced to 6th among public universities and 13th overall among the 268 graduate social work programs in the United States.
Last year, the college ranked 7th and 15th respectively. In 2016, the college marked its first appearance in the top 10 among publics and in the top 20 overall, ranking 9th and 17th, respectively. Rankings are determined from an annual survey of all graduate programs.
“Our continued climb in the rankings is a direct result of the hard work of our faculty, staff and students,” said College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire. “Our success reflects their impact as innovative scholars and creative instructors in the field and the classroom. We are a community of difference makers, and I’m happy that our impact is recognized in this way.”
The newly announced ranking landmark is especially significant as the college celebrates its 100th year anniversary.

The College of Social Work has partnered with Ohio State’s Colleges of Nursing and Veterinary Medicine to provide care to homebound adults and their pets.
The POP (Pet Owner and Pet) Care pilot program is funded through a Hillman Foundation Emergent Innovations grant. It joins the knowledge and service of three academic colleges to transition a pattern of reactive sick care into proactive, holistic well care for homebound adults with multiple chronic conditions and Read complete press release
Click here to read complete press release.

 

 

Congratulations to College of Social Work faculty, staff and students who are presenting at this year’s SSWR conference. The Society for Social Work and Research advances, disseminates, and translates research that addresses issues of social work practice and policy and promotes a diverse, just, and equitable society. Check out who’s presenting and what topics will be covered here.

Tom Gregoire

“People who are in touch with their gratitude are more likely to be happy. You don’t have to drink it or smoke it. You just have to think about what you care about, what you’re grateful for and what is right in the world for you.”

This quote is just a sampling from the college’s latest Social Change Podcast by Dean Tom Gregoire. Listen as he offers a thankful reflection on 2018 and the coming year.

Congratulations to Dr. Keith Warren whose project titled “Development of a statistical framework for the analysis of social network predictors of therapeutic community outcomes” was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This is a three-year grant with total funding of nearly $700,000.

More about the project

Therapeutic communities (TCs) are residential peer support treatment programs for substance abuse, staffed by professionals. In TCs, the community itself is the method of treatment. Clinical change arises from the network of peer interactions. We will be mapping that network and learning the ways in which it predicts outcomes. For example, our pilot work indicates that residents who graduate are connected to other residents who graduate, who are connected to still other residents who graduate. Thus, your success in the program is not just a matter of the people you directly interact with, it goes out one further network jump to the people who interact with them.

For more information about Warren, click here.

Congratulations to Dr. Bridget Freisthler who has received funding from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health for her study titled “Assessing changes in child maltreatment due to the Sacramento Neighborhood Alcohol Prevention Project.” This is a three-year grant with total funding of $1.05 million. For more information, read the project abstract.

 

 

 

College of Social Work faculty attended orientation sessions to jump start the new academic school year and meet and greet with students at Stillman Hall.

The orientation brought students, faculty and staff together to share and receive information as they began  the 2018 school year.

Much success to our CSW students as they start their journey into the field of social work!