Category Archives: News & Events

From dynamic presentations, to networking with colleagues, to the illustrious Buckeye Social, to a dazzling new booth filled with info and goodies–the College of Social Work made quite the impression at this year’s Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) conference. With hundreds of incredible world-changers gathered in one place, it was a conference to remember for CSW staff, faculty, students and alums! The conference was held November 10-13, in Anaheim, CA.

David Jenkins photoThe College of Social work is pleased to welcome Dean David A. Jenkins, PhD, LCSW, as the newly appointed dean of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, effective July 1, 2022, through June 30, 2027.

Jenkins joins the college from the University of Louisville, where he served as professor and dean of the Raymond A. Kent School of Social Work and Family Science since 2016. As dean there, he focused on creating a culture that supports faculty research, resulting in a portfolio of $31 million in external funding. He developed online programs, including a new Doctor of Social Work degree, and strengthened efforts in diversity, equity and inclusion within the Kent School and across the broader campus and communities. He also served as director of academic leadership development in the provost’s office and has worked on university-wide budgeting.

Jenkins replaces Dr. Tom Gregoire, who led the college for 14 years over two terms.

 

The Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce the appointment of Marisa Sheldon (MSW, LISW-S) as director of its Age-Friendly Innovation Center (AFIC).

Prior to her new role, Sheldon served as the AFIC’s assistant director of interdisciplinary engagement and as assistant director of Age-Friendly Communities of Columbus & Franklin County, respectively. Over the last decade, she has also served as community lecturer and field placement coordinator for the college as well as helpline and support coordinator for the Alzheimer’s Association, Central Ohio Chapter. She received her Master of Social Work degree from Ohio State in 2011, preceded by her Bachelor of Science in Social Work in 2010.

Sheldon has been involved with the Age-Friendly initiative since it joined the College of Social Work in 2018 and helped build the foundational work of the center. She brings a strong focus on leading community change to ensure the voices and ideas of older adults are central to the decision-making process. With this same passion, she is committed to inspiring the next generation of those serving in aging, having worked with hundreds of students during her time at the university.

AFIC is the first university-based center in the nation to embrace the full spectrum of needs, opportunities and complex issues related to age-friendly communities—bringing to bear the resources, partnerships, and brainpower of a top-tier research university with the expertise of older residents to transform our communities and make them more livable for all. Its mission is to innovate with older adults through research, education, and engagement to ensure inclusion and build resiliency to make communities more age friendly–all achieved through collaborating with Ohio State interdisciplinary faculty, students, and community partners.

Building off more than six years of work, the AFIC continues to prioritize the contributions of older residents to improve social, built and health environments that support livability for people of all ages and abilities. The community impacts of this work reverberate beyond older adults, increasing quality of life for individuals of all age groups and abilities within and outside central Ohio, and its results are shared with partners across the United States and around the globe.

“Marisa’s commitment to her work with the AFIC and Age-Friendly Columbus has been significant, and we are pleased to have her advance as director,” says College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire. “Our college has a strong commitment to research and teaching in aging and recognizes the considerable asset that older adults represent in our society. The AFIC is among the nation’s most innovative programs in building a community where older adults and all can thrive. We are excited about what the AFIC offers and are confident in continued impact under Marisa’s leadership and vision.”

AFIC is recognized as a national leader in the age-friendly network, having secured over $2 million from public and private funders, AFIC has published nine manuscripts and numerous reports in partnership with students, interdisciplinary faculty and community members.  AFIC has reached over 16,000 individuals through community-based participatory research, presentations, surveys, focus groups or walk audits. Through the Scholars Program, course collaborations and internships, AFIC has engaged 120 students representing 17 disciplines.

Last year, Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny, associate professor and AFIC director of research, received Ohio State’s Community Engagement Scholar award and the initiative was also honored with the university’s Outreach and Engagement award in 2020. The CSWE Commission for Diversity and Social Economic Justice honored Age-Friendly with the Community Partnership Action Award in 2019.

Before receiving center designation in 2021, AFIC operated as Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County under the college for three years and joined the World Health Organization and AARP International Network of Age-Friendly Communities in 2016. Age-Friendly Columbus previously operated under the guidance of the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC).

The AFIC is located at Rev1 Labs, 1275 Kinnear Road. Sheldon succeeds Katie White who led the initiative and succeeding center since 2016.

For more information about AFIC, click here.

Contact: Frankie Jones-Harris, communications director, at jones-harris.1@osu.edu or 614-330-2206.

No one wants to miss a loved one’s graduation, but what if you’re on the other side of the country or across the ocean? The College of Social Work solves that problem for those faraway guests wishing to attend its annual ceremony known as the Evening of Recognition.

The college streams the event live so guests from all over the United States can watch their graduating family and friends be recognized, receive honors and walk the stage. Although the ceremony was cancelled during COVID-19, in years past, more than 125 guests from more than 30 states–and as far away as Hawaii–have tuned in, and the event has trended on Twitter. The event has also attracted YouTube viewers from as far away as Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Syria and Australia. Onlookers, both via the live feed and in person, are also invited to tweet shout outs and well wishes to the graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage in Mershon Auditorium on Ohio State’s campus.

This year, there were two separate ceremonies with one on Friday, May 6 at 6:30 p.m. (BSSW students) and the other on Monday, May 9 at 6:30 p.m. (MSW and PhD students).

The college, known for being technology-forward, added live streaming and tweeting during the ceremony several years ago. The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!” is a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

To view the 2022 BSSW ceremony, click here.

To view the 2022 MSW ceremony, click here.

David Jenkins photoThe College of Social work is pleased to announce that David A. Jenkins, PhD, LCSW, has been appointed dean of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, effective July 1, 2022, through June 30, 2027. Jenkins will replace Dean Tom Gregoire, who has led the college for 14 years over two terms.

Jenkins joins the college from the University of Louisville, where he currently serves as professor and dean of the Raymond A. Kent School of Social Work and Family Science since 2016. As dean, he has focused on creating a culture that supports faculty research, resulting in a portfolio of $31 million in external funding. He has developed online programs, including a new Doctor of Social Work degree, and strengthened efforts in diversity, equity and inclusion within the Kent School and across the broader campus and communities. He currently serves as director of academic leadership development in the provost’s office and has worked on university-wide budgeting.

His scholarship focuses on health disparities faced by marginalized individuals and families, seeking to better understand lived experiences of those underrepresented in academic and professional literature. Most frequently, his research examines the lives and issues facing sexual minorities as individuals, couples and families.

Jenkins earned his BS in business administration and MSW from Louisiana State University in addition to a PhD in social work from Florida State University. He also is certified as a licensed clinical social worker. Before arriving at the University of Louisville, he served on the social work faculty of Texas Christian University for 25 years, including nine years as department chair.

“I am thrilled to be joining the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University,” says Jenkins. “The college plays such an important role on the campus, in Columbus, and throughout the state of Ohio. I look forward to building on the great work of Dean Gregoire.”

During a time of growth and stability shepherded by Dean Gregoire, Jenkins comes to Columbus to lead the college’s next chapter. Since becoming dean in 2008, Gregoire has made it a priority to showcase faculty, staff, students and alumni for their contributions to the understanding of society’s most vexing social problems. His leadership has focused on technology, online education, social justice, increasing research funding and most importantly, scholarships to students. Under Gregoire’s direction, between 2012 and 2020, the college has advanced in U.S. News and World Report’s Best Graduate School rankings from 26th nationally and 15th among public universities, to 13th nationally and 6th among publics, respectively.

Jenkins is poised to continue the momentum and move the college forward.

 

For more information, contact Frankie Jones-Harris, communications director, at jones-harris.1@osu.edu or 614-330-2206.

Did you know that March doubles as Social Work Month and Women’s History Month? Celebrate with us as we note just a few of the many contributions of both social workers and women.

Example slide from slideshow

View the slideshow!

Congratulations to Dr. Dawn Anderson-Butcher who has been selected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSSW). Anderson-Butcher is the first faculty member in the college’s history to be inducted into this honorific society of distinguished scholars and practitioners.

Anderson-Butcher joins an esteemed selection of over 140 Fellows dedicated to achieving excellence in the field of social work and social welfare through high-impact work that advances social good. AASWSSW Fellows consist of prominent scholars, top researchers and practitioners with unparalleled insight and professional experience who make exceptional contributions to the field and beyond. This coveted achievement acknowledges Anderson-Butcher’s considerable contributions to the profession as a scholar.

Anderson-Butcher serves as a professor at Ohio State’s College of Social Work as well as executive director for teaching/learning and research for its LiFEsports initiative.

For more information about Anderson-Butcher, click here.

To see the AASWSSW announcement, click here.

Did you know that...

This year, the College of Social Work is celebrating the many products invented or redesigned by Black people. From the dust pan, hair brush and ice cream scooper, to the mailbox, traffic light, and curtain rod, the significant inventions of Black people have impacted the world. Take a look to see what you know and can learn.

View the slideshow

View the slideshow!

Congratulations to Dean Tom Gregoire on his appointment by Governor Mike DeWine to the OneOhio Recovery Foundation governing board. Gregoire was one of only five people appointed by Governor DeWine for this exemplary honor and will be a tremendous asset to the foundation board. The Foundation will distribute a portion of the settlement funds from the drug manufacturers and distributors of opioids to communities in Ohio. To read more about this significant accomplishment, click here.

Additionally, Gregoire, Lisa Durham and Steve David were also one of seven Ohio State research teams awarded nearly $1.4 million through the President’s Research Excellence Catalyst Grant Program. Both from the College of Social Work, Durham serves as assistant dean of strategic initiatives and community engagement and David as advocacy director. The research team will address societal challenges related to food, water, health, racial equity and inclusion and national security. For more information, click here.

For more information about Gregoire, click here.

Each year, the College of Social Work honors alumni who have gone above and beyond to make a difference in the world. These leaders were nominated by our alumni—more than 13,500 social workers living in the United States and abroad. Please join us in honoring these inspiring ambassadors.

2020 Alumni Hall of Fame Inductees

2020 Alumni Hall of Fame Inductees

2021 Alumni Hall of Fame Inductees

2021 Alumni Hall of Fame Inductees

This fall, due to COVID-19 in 2020, the college recognized honorees from both 2020 and 2021. The luncheon was held Friday, October 8, 2021 at the Fawcett Center.

Congratulations to Dr. Shannon Jarrott!

Dr. Jarrott recently received a USDA grant entitled, “Building Relationships Intergenerationally through Guided Mentoring – BRIDGE2Health: An intergenerational mentoring program.”

This five-year $1.28M project takes an intergenerational community-based participatory research approach to programming in Cuyahoga County, Ohio and Amherst County, Virginia.

The focal population will be teenagers, approximately half of whom are in foster and kinship (e.g., grandparent) care, and older adult participants, including volunteers affiliated with a local partner. Annual cohorts of paired teen and older adult mentors will engage in a train-the-trainer model by which participants build skills with age peers and then with intergenerational partners before engaging in community outreach.

By engaging teens and older adults as partners in evidence-based curricula to identify needs and assets to which they can jointly respond through bi-directional mentoring, we anticipate achievement of short-term goals that include formation of trusting, supportive relationships, positive social norms, and belonging. Long-term goals include teen skill building and resilience and older adults’ generative achievement. The two communities, working with OSU Extension, and VCE, will have better coordinated, sustainable services reflecting community needs.

Congratulations to Dr. Nancy Mendoza!

She recently received a National on Deafness and Other Communication (NIDCD) diversity supplement for parent award, “SES-Related Disparities in Early Language Development and Child Risk for Developmental Language Disorder,” with funding just under $200,000!

The two-year project will focus on understanding how the COVID-19 crisis, and related changes in caregiver distress and interactions with infants, affects infant language development over a 12-month period.

Innovative aspects of this supplemental grant include collecting multiple caregiver-infant interactions, including secondary caregiver-infant interactions, and using smartphone technology to conduct in-home assessments among vulnerable groups who are often left out of digital data collection studies, including COVID-19 studies. This supplemental award will provide Nancy the opportunity to be part of an experienced research team under the mentorship of Dr. Laura Justice, OSU College of Education and Human Ecology.

Short North neighborhood in Columbus, OhioIn an effort to provide more support for those who are housing-vulnerable in the off-campus area, Ohio State is adding a full-time social worker with a special focus on North High Street.

Students at the CSW will also receive invaluable field experience with this new addition.

“Our students will benefit greatly from this initiative and get a personal view of the issues that can lead to housing vulnerability,” said Dean Tom Gregoire.

You can read the full article here.

Congratulations to Dr. Camille R. Quinn who is celebrating an impressive amount of research much of which impacts African American youth. Her work has also been picked up by a variety of news outlets and websites from around the country. See below for highlights and links.

Recent research from Quinn’s reveals that:
• Caregivers’ trauma may filter down to younger generations and specifically trigger PTSD among Black girls in the juvenile justice system. Read more.
• Black teens and young adults living in public housing are a “hidden population” when it comes to suicide prevention efforts. Read more.

Additionally, just a remarkable, Dr. Quinn:
• Was reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Juvenile Justice. Her term began on January 29, 2021, and will end on October 31, 2023.
• Provided written testimony in support of SB256, which passed.
• Moderated and shared remarks during a live, national virtual session on Girls in the Juvenile Justice System called “Conversations on the Road to Unlocked” in May prior to the “Unlocked” national conference in October 2021 in Philadelphia, PA.
• Worked with CSW PhD candidates Oliver Beer and Rebecca Phillips to publish an article examining stress, coping strategies and health outcomes among social workers in Ohio. Read more.
• Hosted “Do More, Do It Now,” a presentation focused on Black girls and young women in the juvenile justice system and part of the Kirwan Institute’s bi-weekly forum series.
Link: https://bit.ly/2MZ1ld7
• Served on a special panel of experts discussing the HBO documentary, “True Justice,” which highlights the work of Bryan Stevenson and the Equal Justice Initiative.

For more information on Quinn, click here.

The College of Social Work is pleased to announce its new Age-Friendly Innovation Center (AFIC).

The mission of AFIC is to innovate with older adults through research, education and engagement to ensure inclusion and build resiliency to make communities more age-friendly. This will be achieved through collaborating with Ohio State interdisciplinary faculty, students and community partners.

Building off five years of progress, the AFIC will continue to prioritize the contributions of older residents to improve social, built and health environments that support livability for people of all ages and abilities. The new center will be located at Rev1 Labs, 1275 Kinnear Road and will be celebrated in an upcoming event.

For more information about the work of age-friendly, click here or contact Director Katie White at white.3073@osu.edu

The Ohio State University College of Social Work is in solidarity with transgender and gender diverse children, adolescents, and adults. As social workers and scholars, we promote social justice for vulnerable populations through high-quality research and evidence-based practice. Read the full statement from the college.

Congratulations to Dr. Alan Davis whose recently published research shows the impact psychedelic drugs may have in several areas.

Who may benefit most from psychedelics used in therapy?

In March, Davis published research showing that patients who are open to new experiences and willing to surrender to the unknown may benefit most from psychedelics used as therapy for mental health disorders. The study can be viewed online in the journal ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science.

To read the complete press release, click here.

Davis’ research was picked up by multiple news sources including News Medical, Science Daily, Medical Xpress, Mirage News and Newswise.

One psychedelic experience may lessen trauma of racial injustice

Late last year, Davis’ also published new research showing that just one positive experience on a psychedelic drug may help reduce the lasting trauma of racial injustice in Black, Indigenous and people of color. The study can be viewed online in the journal Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy.

To read the press release, click here.

Davis’ research was picked up in several news sources including The New York Post, Whole Foods, ANI: South Asia’s leading multimedia news agency reaching Canada and India, Yahoo!, British news outlet DailyMail.com and The College Fix.

To learn more about Davis, click here.

Did you know that...

This year, the College of Social Work is celebrating the many products invented or redesigned by Black people. From the dust pan, hair brush and ice cream scooper, to the mailbox, traffic light, and curtain rod, the significant inventions of Black people have impacted the world. Take a look to see what you know and can learn.

View the slideshow

View the slideshow!

As the new year approaches, so does anxiety around what it may hold, especially as we continue to deal with the uncertainty of COVID19, and now the rollout of vaccines.

Will the new year be as disruptive as 2020? When can we stop wearing masks and social distancing? Will jobs return and small businesses rebound? Now add the usual heavy weight of expectations for a new start and unrealistic resolutions, and you’re dealing with even more stress. Whatever the new year ushers in, stress will certainly be on the list.
College of Social Work senior community lecturer Kelley Breidigan, MSW, LISW-S (MSW ’09), spoke with The Columbus Dispatch and ABC6-TV about ways to cope with both New Year’s and holiday stress. Breidigan has nine years of undergraduate and graduate classroom experience and is a seasoned mental health professional.

Read the story.

Listen here.

You won’t want to miss the college’s new Social Change podcast spinoff, Bry & Bold, dedicated to amplifying community voices, issues and conversations that need to be heard. Host Bryanna Stigger (left) discusses with Dr. Camille R. Quinn the importance of allyship, what being an ally really means, concepts of equity, and much more during this podcast premiere. Stigger serves as the college’s MSW outreach program coordinator.

Listen HERE and watch for more podcasts coming your way soon!

For previous Social Change podcasts, click here.

Just about everything has changed with COVID-19—even the way you get your CSW alumni magazine, The Stillman!

Click here for a PDF.

Click here to visit the web page.

Issue highlights include:
• A curriculum reformed
• Social work dean chairs university task force
• NASW leads a profession
• Stepping up and out during chaos
• How are parents coping during COVID-19?

Congratulations to Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny who recently made two splashes in the media. Dabelko-Schoeny was featured on WOSU/NPR’s All Sides with Ann Fisher radio show discussing issues related to aging, ageism and how that is reflected in policymaking. Her team-written, op-ed piece was also published in the Star Tribune, identifying Adult Day Service as essential and in crisis.

Missed the show? Click here.
Interested in reading the column? Click here.
Learn more about Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny here.

Chris and Preston McMurryThe Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce the establishment of the Donna Theresa and Preston V. McMurry Jr. Scholarship Fund, effective February 2020. The scholarship supports social work students who make a commitment to support survivors of domestic violence. The first scholarship was awarded this spring to MSW student Lucy Hennon for the 2020–21 academic year.

“I plan to use my coursework and training to further educate myself on direct support for victims and survivors through inclusive, trauma-informed and survivor-led approaches,” says Hennon. “I feel immensely privileged and fortunate to be selected as a scholarship recipient and want to express my gratitude and excitement to Preston McMurry, Jr. and the College of Social Work.”

McMurry (BSSW ’60) established the Donna Theresa and Preston McMurry, Jr. Scholarship Fund to create an immediate impact on furthering the pool of social workers who commit to working in the field of domestic violence by supporting their education.

Endowing this scholarship is McMurry’s latest investment in responding to domestic violence and is the product of his decades long commitment to survivors of violence.

In 1992, McMurry established Theresa’s Fund, a private family foundation that has raised over $49,000,000 to combat child abuse and family violence in Arizona. In August 2014, Preston and his son, Chris, launched DomesticShelters.org, an innovative and comprehensive online platform focused on persons threatened by family violence and those who are supporting them. As the first searchable online database of resources for persons experiencing domestic violence, DomesticShelters.org has had a profound impact. The website now averages 3,000,000 visits annually and has a wealth of resources and support. The College of Social Work is highly supportive of DomesticShelters.org and will continue to partner with the McMurrys to further engage its faculty and students, and to help advance the impact of the important program.

“My father started his work on domestic violence by creating Theresa’s Fund around 1990, almost three decades ago, when domestic violence wasn’t yet a public conversation,” says Chris. “He’s always sought innovative ideas that mix raising awareness with his soft spot for young people and successful futures.”

Domestic violence is often a silent problem. Victims are fearful of retribution and experience shame and embarrassment due to their situation, all of which makes it difficult to seek help. During the current COVID-19 crisis, reports of domestic violence to public safety officials has sky-rocketed as has the number of visits to domestic violence websites and calls to hotlines. Stay-at-home orders, economic losses and other factors lead to increased stress and sometimes additional violence. As the world continues to enter circumstances it has never before experienced, new spikes in domestic violence may likely continue.

Preston McMurry, of Phoenix, is also founder of the McMurry Scholar Athlete Citizenship Award, which started in 2008 to honor student-athletes with a minimum 3.0 GPA and who performed significant community service. He made his first substantial philanthropic commitment to the college in 2008.

In 1984, he created one of the largest privately owned marketing firms in the nation, McMurry, Inc.—the only company in the U.S. to be selected by the San Francisco-based Great Place to Work Institute, as one of the ten best places to work, eight years in a row.

In reflecting upon this gift and McMurry’s career, Dean Tom Gregoire observed, “I have great affection and gratitude for Preston McMurry, and I consider him a friend and a mentor. Preston’s entire career has been informed by a deep commitment to values we hold dear as social workers, and to action on behalf of others.”

Congratulations U.S. Marine Corps veteran and BSSW student Tom Wike who has been named a 2020 Tillman Military Scholar. Wike is a senior with plans to earn his MSW. He is one of 60 scholars selected from thousands of applicants by the Pat Tillman Foundation for the prestigious award.
In recognition of their service and leadership potential, the new class of Tillman Scholars will receive scholarship funding to pursue higher education and continue their service in the fields of healthcare, business, law, public service, STEM, education and the humanities.

Read more about Wike here.

Click here for the news release.

More than 5,100 people tuned into the College of Social Work’s first virtual celebration of its 2020 graduates on Friday, May 8, at 6 p.m. The Evening of Recognition was live-streamed and interactive, including live tweets to and from students, families, friends, college staff and faculty as well a message from Dean Tom Gregoire.

From Germany to Egypt, and as far away as Pakistan to India, people from all over the world including the United States watched and participated by sending 2020 CSW graduates off in grand style. A record number of more than 600 people remarked and sent well wishes via Twitter, along with another 1,000 reactions, including likes, hearts, cares and more.

Solving the distance problem is nothing new for the college. For years, it has allowed loved ones from across the country or ocean join the on-campus graduation celebration via live stream and Twitter. This year, it applied learned lessons and adhered to social distancing guidelines to host this special event for its graduates and their families.

Background: The college is known for its live-streamed graduation ceremony allowing faraway guests from all over the United States and world to watch their graduating family and friends be recognized, receive honors and walk the stage. Previously, onlookers, both via a live feed and in person, tweeted shout outs and well wishes to graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage in Mershon Auditorium on Ohio State’s campus.

The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!” is a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

To view this year’s virtual Evening of Recognition, click here.

To assist isolated older adults, the College of Social Work’s Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County initiative is partnering with Columbus City Council, the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resource Center and other local organizations to establish the new Friendly Phone Line.

The Friendly Phone Line at 614/993-3614 is created for older adults in greater Columbus who are looking for informal conversation and social connection. It is staffed by social work students, staff and faculty volunteers.

The partnership also launched a program that packs and delivers 200 necessity bags each week to older adults across Franklin County. Bags contain three-to-five days’ worth of shelf stable food, dependent upon availability through the Mid-Ohio Foodbank, as well as other necessities like soap, shampoo and toilet paper. Educational materials, such as Files of Life (a list of contact information used in emergencies), community resources, notes of encouragement and Census 2020 information, are included in the bags as well.

Click here to learn about resources for older adults.

Congratulations to Dr. Shannon Jarrott on two recent accomplishments impacting intergenerational research and programs.

Generations United has released a new publication that includes partners Jarrott, the Champion Intergenerational Center and The Eisner Foundation. It is entitled “Piecing It Together: What We Know About the Funding Puzzle for Spaces that Connect Young and Old.”

Jarrott has also partnered with Generations United and The Eisner Foundation to release a new Intergenerational Evaluation Toolkit. A compilation of 15 years of collaborative research, the toolkit offers resources to help program providers and researchers impact intergenerational programing and practices. To view the toolkit, click here.

Also supporting intergenerational research, Jarrott is collaborating with faculty at Oregon State University to develop a measure of intergenerational contact. The study is supported by a grant from The Retirement Research Foundation.

For more information about Dr. Jarrott, click here.

For more information on the Champion Intergenerational Center, click here.