Category Archives: News & Events

Congratulations U.S. Marine Corps veteran and BSSW student Tom Wike who has been named a 2020 Tillman Military Scholar. Wike is a senior with plans to earn his MSW. He is one of 60 scholars selected from thousands of applicants by the Pat Tillman Foundation for the prestigious award.
In recognition of their service and leadership potential, the new class of Tillman Scholars will receive scholarship funding to pursue higher education and continue their service in the fields of healthcare, business, law, public service, STEM, education and the humanities.

Read more about Wike here.

Click here for the news release.

More than 5,100 people tuned into the College of Social Work’s first virtual celebration of its 2020 graduates on Friday, May 8, at 6 p.m. The Evening of Recognition was live-streamed and interactive, including live tweets to and from students, families, friends, college staff and faculty as well a message from Dean Tom Gregoire.

From Germany to Egypt, and as far away as Pakistan to India, people from all over the world including the United States watched and participated by sending 2020 CSW graduates off in grand style. A record number of more than 600 people remarked and sent well wishes via Twitter, along with another 1,000 reactions, including likes, hearts, cares and more.

Solving the distance problem is nothing new for the college. For years, it has allowed loved ones from across the country or ocean join the on-campus graduation celebration via live stream and Twitter. This year, it applied learned lessons and adhered to social distancing guidelines to host this special event for its graduates and their families.

Background: The college is known for its live-streamed graduation ceremony allowing faraway guests from all over the United States and world to watch their graduating family and friends be recognized, receive honors and walk the stage. Previously, onlookers, both via a live feed and in person, tweeted shout outs and well wishes to graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage in Mershon Auditorium on Ohio State’s campus.

The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!” is a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

To view this year’s virtual Evening of Recognition, click here.

To assist isolated older adults, the College of Social Work’s Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County initiative is partnering with Columbus City Council, the Clintonville-Beechwold Community Resource Center and other local organizations to establish the new Friendly Phone Line.

The Friendly Phone Line at 614/993-3614 is created for older adults in greater Columbus who are looking for informal conversation and social connection. It is staffed by social work students, staff and faculty volunteers.

The partnership also launched a program that packs and delivers 200 necessity bags each week to older adults across Franklin County. Bags contain three-to-five days’ worth of shelf stable food, dependent upon availability through the Mid-Ohio Foodbank, as well as other necessities like soap, shampoo and toilet paper. Educational materials, such as Files of Life (a list of contact information used in emergencies), community resources, notes of encouragement and Census 2020 information, are included in the bags as well.

Click here to learn about resources for older adults.

Congratulations to Dr. Shannon Jarrott on two recent accomplishments impacting intergenerational research and programs.

Generations United has released a new publication that includes partners Jarrott, the Champion Intergenerational Center and The Eisner Foundation. It is entitled “Piecing It Together: What We Know About the Funding Puzzle for Spaces that Connect Young and Old.”

Jarrott has also partnered with Generations United and The Eisner Foundation to release a new Intergenerational Evaluation Toolkit. A compilation of 15 years of collaborative research, the toolkit offers resources to help program providers and researchers impact intergenerational programing and practices. To view the toolkit, click here.

Also supporting intergenerational research, Jarrott is collaborating with faculty at Oregon State University to develop a measure of intergenerational contact. The study is supported by a grant from The Retirement Research Foundation.

For more information about Dr. Jarrott, click here.

For more information on the Champion Intergenerational Center, click here.

Congrats to LiFEsports! The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is highlighting LiFEsports in its National Youth Sports Strategy report. The initiative is featured on pages 32-33.

To read the report, click here.

For more information about LiFEsports, click here.

Congratulations to Dr. Alicia Bunger whose R34 “Collaborating to Implement Cross-System Interventions in Child Welfare and Substance Use” was recently funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This is Bunger’s first NIH R award.
This three-year project, with a total funding of over $700,000, will examine implementation of Ohio START in the initial 17 counties. The study focuses on cross-system collaboration strategies, and the conditions under which they are most effective for implementing the START model, an intervention that integrates substance use treatment and child welfare systems to facilitate parents’ access to treatment and recovery. The team will develop and pilot a collaboration decision-support guide for executive leaders.
The project is being carried out in partnership with the Public Children Services Association of Ohio (PCSAO). The interdisciplinary team includes Drs. Emmeline Chuang (UCLA Fielding School of Public Health), Amanda Girth (OSU Glenn College) and Kathryn Lancaster (OSU College of Public Health).

For more information about Bunger, click here.

As part of a new program in a partnership between The Ohio State University and Honda R&D Americas, Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny will lead a project to create a monthly user group of older adults and individuals with disabilities to test, review and provide recommendations to enhance future mobility products and services. The project will be led by an interdisciplinary team of faculty, students and community members and will be digitally documented through branded storytelling. The goal of the new partnership is to nurture innovative ideas to help make transportation easier, safer and more environmentally friendly.  Read more.

The College of Social Work is pleased to announce its involvement in a new Ohio initiative that aims to reduce opioid overdose deaths by 40 percent in 19 Ohio counties, including nine rural counties, six of which are in Appalachia.

The new initiative, part of the federal HEALing Communities Study, will use real-time research to focus prevention, treatment and recovery programs in the state, which has been hit especially hard by opioid deaths.The study is a $350 million investment by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); its HEAL (Helping to End Addiction Long-term) initiative is designed to reduce overdose deaths by 40 percent in participating communities.

In total, Ohio will receive $65.9 million federal research grant dollars to address the opioid epidemic and implement interventions, headed by The Ohio State University, and including a consortium of academic, state and community partners.

The college’s Dr. Bridget Freisthler, professor and associate dean for research and faculty development, will lead the initiative’s Community Engagement core, along with the College of Public Health’s Dr. Pamela Salsberry, professor and associate dean for community outreach and engagement. Embedded in their work is the perspective that communities are the experts of their local environment. Freisthler and Salsberry will work with communities to identify and implement evidence-based interventions that will be most likely to reduce opioid overdose deaths given their local context, determine ways to strengthen connections of agencies involved in local coalitions, and work with communities to try and reduce stigma related to addiction and treatment.

“This is a real opportunity for Ohio to reverse the entrenched problem of opioid misuse and overdoses while drawing on the strengths and resources of local communities,” says Freisthler. “By providing counties with the much needed training, technical assistance and funding to implement evidence-based interventions, we hope to bring solutions to the many families affected by this epidemic.”

For more information, click here.

For an interview with Freisthler, contact Frankie Jones-Harris, Communications Director, at 614/330-2206 or jones-harris.1@osu.edu.

 

The Ohio State University College of Social Work’s graduate program is celebrating another milestone as it climbs in the U.S. News & World Report’s rankings of America’s Best Graduate Schools. In the 2020 rankings, the college advanced to 6th among public universities and 13th overall among the 268 graduate social work programs in the United States.
Last year, the college ranked 7th and 15th respectively. In 2016, the college marked its first appearance in the top 10 among publics and in the top 20 overall, ranking 9th and 17th, respectively. Rankings are determined from an annual survey of all graduate programs.
“Our continued climb in the rankings is a direct result of the hard work of our faculty, staff and students,” said College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire. “Our success reflects their impact as innovative scholars and creative instructors in the field and the classroom. We are a community of difference makers, and I’m happy that our impact is recognized in this way.”
The newly announced ranking landmark is especially significant as the college celebrates its 100th year anniversary.

The College of Social Work has partnered with Ohio State’s Colleges of Nursing and Veterinary Medicine to provide care to homebound adults and their pets.
The POP (Pet Owner and Pet) Care pilot program is funded through a Hillman Foundation Emergent Innovations grant. It joins the knowledge and service of three academic colleges to transition a pattern of reactive sick care into proactive, holistic well care for homebound adults with multiple chronic conditions and Read complete press release
Click here to read complete press release.

 

 

Congratulations to College of Social Work faculty, staff and students who are presenting at this year’s SSWR conference. The Society for Social Work and Research advances, disseminates, and translates research that addresses issues of social work practice and policy and promotes a diverse, just, and equitable society. Check out who’s presenting and what topics will be covered here.

Tom Gregoire

“People who are in touch with their gratitude are more likely to be happy. You don’t have to drink it or smoke it. You just have to think about what you care about, what you’re grateful for and what is right in the world for you.”

This quote is just a sampling from the college’s latest Social Change Podcast by Dean Tom Gregoire. Listen as he offers a thankful reflection on 2018 and the coming year.

Congratulations to Dr. Keith Warren whose project titled “Development of a statistical framework for the analysis of social network predictors of therapeutic community outcomes” was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This is a three-year grant with total funding of nearly $700,000.

More about the project

Therapeutic communities (TCs) are residential peer support treatment programs for substance abuse, staffed by professionals. In TCs, the community itself is the method of treatment. Clinical change arises from the network of peer interactions. We will be mapping that network and learning the ways in which it predicts outcomes. For example, our pilot work indicates that residents who graduate are connected to other residents who graduate, who are connected to still other residents who graduate. Thus, your success in the program is not just a matter of the people you directly interact with, it goes out one further network jump to the people who interact with them.

For more information about Warren, click here.

Congratulations to Dr. Bridget Freisthler who has received funding from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health for her study titled “Assessing changes in child maltreatment due to the Sacramento Neighborhood Alcohol Prevention Project.” This is a three-year grant with total funding of $1.05 million. For more information, read the project abstract.

 

 

 

College of Social Work faculty attended orientation sessions to jump start the new academic school year and meet and greet with students at Stillman Hall.

The orientation brought students, faculty and staff together to share and receive information as they began  the 2018 school year.

Much success to our CSW students as they start their journey into the field of social work!

A report recently released in Washington, D.C., by Generations United and The Eisner Foundation recognized the significant and impressive work of the Champion Intergenerational Enrichment and Education Center (IGC). IGC students, staff and participants are represented in the report, All in Together: Creating Places Where Young and Old Thrive, as well as those from Ohio State, Columbus Early Learning Center, National Church Residences and other intergenerational programs across the nation. Continue reading

An impressive 360 College of Social Work graduates and 1,400 of their guests packed out Ohio State’s Mershon Auditorium on Friday, May 4, for the college’s annual Evening of Recognition, an event honoring social work graduates. Momentum soared during the ceremony as students were honored with yellow roses, awards and live tweet shouts and well wishes displayed on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the auditorium stage.

Two days later, the 534 social work graduates received their degrees during The Ohio State University’s Spring Commencement. A record breaking 11,907 Ohio State students earned degrees and more than half of them participated in the ceremony. Ohio State is one of the few universities where all graduates participate in a single ceremony, and where each graduate gets his or her diploma at the ceremony.

College’s Graduation Ceremony: A Unique Blend of Technology and Tradition

No one wants to miss a loved one’s graduation, but what if you’re on the other side of the country or across the ocean? The College of Social Work solves that problem for those faraway guests wishing to attend its annual pre-commencement ceremony known as the Evening of Recognition. With a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media, the college streams the event live so guests from all over the United States can watch their graduating family and friends be recognized, receive honors and walk the stage.

The event typically draws more than 125 online guests from more than 30 states–and as far away as Hawaii–as well as viewers from other countries such as Argentina and Canada. YouTube viewers have watched from as far away as Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia.

The Evening of Recognition trends on Twitter, too. Onlookers, both via the live feed and in person, are invited to tweet shout outs and well wishes to the graduates on a 12 x 16-foot screen displayed above the stage in Mershon Auditorium on Ohio State’s campus.

The college, known for being technology-forward, added live streaming and tweeting during the ceremony several years ago. The ceremony, unofficially themed “Look out world, here comes help!” is a perfect blend of celebration, technology and social media at their best.

To watch this traditional, cutting-edge way of celebrating College of Social Work graduates, click here.

The Ohio State University College of Social Work’s graduate program has continued to climb in the U.S. News & World Report’s rankings of America’s Best Graduate Schools. In the 2018 rankings, the college advanced to 7th among public universities and 15th overall among the 253 graduate social work programs in the United States. In 2016, the college ranked 9th and 17th, respectively, which was at that time its first appearance in the top 10 among publics and in the top 20 overall. Rankings are determined from an annual survey of all graduate programs.

“I’m very proud of our faculty, staff and students. This continued climb in the rankings reflects their impact as innovative scholars and creative instructors in the field and the classroom. We are a community of difference makers, and I’m happy that our impact is recognized in this way,” said College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire.

For more information, contact Communications Director Frankie Jones-Harris at jones-harris.1@osu.edu or 614/330-2206.

More than 350 people recently attended an Ohio State Weekend of Veterans Awareness, held on Friday, April 6 and on Saturday, April 7.

The weekend kicked off with a free screening of the film “Thank You for Your Service” at the Wexner Center for the Arts Film/Video Theatre. It was followed by a panel discussion featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Finkel and a book signing at Mershon Auditorium.

On Saturday, nonprofit Run Down the Demons hosted its annual 5K Obstacle Run/Walk at Remembrance Park to raise awareness about mental health issues veterans face, such as suicide & PTSD. The 5K course is designed to be mentally & physically challenging, similar to experiencing the “unknowns” associated with PTSD. Proceeds from the 5K go toward veterans-related programming and initiatives.

The Weekend of Awareness was a collaboration of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, Office of Military and Veterans Service and nonprofit Run Down the Demons.

Age-Friendly Columbus, in collaboration with Franklin County and The Ohio State University College of Social Work, hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday, February 26, at Blackburn Community Center, located at 263 Carpenter St., in Columbus. The ceremony celebrated Age-Friendly Columbus’ new office space at Blackburn, as well as its transition to Ohio State’s College of Social Work.

Attending dignitaries included Bill Armbruster, AARP National Age-Friendly Senior Advisor, City of Columbus Councilmember Michael Stinziano, Ohio State College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire and others.

In January, Age-Friendly Columbus, a collaborative initiative that serves the city’s aging population, announced its transition to the College of Social Work. Age-Friendly Columbus Director Katie White will continue to lead the initiative at the college, working alongside Assistant Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Community Engagement Lisa Durham.

With the planning phase and new strategic plan complete, the College of Social Work will oversee its implementation, which includes directing the outlined goals and strategies that will shape Columbus and Franklin County into an age-friendly community for decades to come.

“We are so pleased to not only host Age-Friendly, but to be an active partner in the work that will be happening,” says College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire. “Our college has a strong presence in aging research, teaching and community engagement, and we are excited by the possibilities of what we can further develop and create with Age Friendly.”

The college’s Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny and Dr. Shannon Jarrott are at the forefront of aging research and expertise. They’re also involved in a one-of-a-kind, innovative intergenerational day care hosted by the college and located in a low-income neighborhood. The center blends generations and serves older adults and children together while also training students from multiple disciplines.

“The Age-Friendly initiative will provide students and faculty the opportunity to work in collaboration with older adults to support a high quality of life for people of all ages,” says Dabelko-Schoeny. “We have the opportunity to engage across disciplines and with the public and private sectors to make our community the best place to live for all generations.”

The move also comes at a crucial time. Central Ohio’s population of 65 years or older is going to double over the next 35 years. Insight2050 revealed that older adults are seeking walkable communities and a different style of home – smaller and in mixed-use neighborhoods. This single demographic change will have a huge impact on housing, transportation, and employment.

Age-Friendly Columbus previously operated under the guidance of the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC). Funders for Age-Friendly Columbus include the Franklin County Office on Aging, City of Columbus, Columbus City Council, Central Ohio Area Agency on Aging and The Columbus Foundation.

About the College of Social Work
First accredited in 1919, the College of Social Work is the oldest continuously accredited public social work program in the country.  The College–through excellence in teaching, research, and service–prepares leaders who enhance individual and community well-being, celebrate difference, and promote social and economic justice for vulnerable populations. The college fosters social change through collaboration with individuals, families, communities, and other change agents to build strengths and resolve complex individual and social problems. As an internationally recognized college, it builds and applies knowledge that positively impacts Ohio, the nation, and the world. The college’s vision is to “embrace difference, seek justice, and be the change.”

For more information, contact:

  • Katie White, Age-Friendly Columbus Director, white.3073@osu.edu.
  • Frankie Jones-Harris, OSU College of Social Work Communications Director, 614-330-2206 or jones-harris.1@osu.edu.

Congratulations to Dr. Michelle Kaiser whose research was featured by CBS 10-TV, Sunny 95 radio, and other media and websites recently. Kaiser’s research finds that a third of households – double previous estimates – struggle to get enough food in a Columbus area. Check out the video and other story links.

CBS/WBNS 10-TV

The Columbus Dispatch Story

Sunny 95 radio

Ohio State Research Story

In 2016, Kaiser was honored with The Ohio State University’s highest teaching award, the Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching. She was chosen out of more than 3,000 Ohio State faculty members. Ohio State’s Alumni Magazine also featured Kaiser’s research in a special report on food insecurity. Click here to check out her story. For more information about Kaiser, click here. 

 

 

Congratulations to the Higher Education Center and its ScreenU program, which were highlighted in the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis Report recently released. Click here to read more about the Commission’s recommendation to implement screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment on college campuses, as well as other recommendations for reducing substance misuse.

For more information about the HECAOD, click here.

COLUMBUS, OHIO — The Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce that it has received a $3 million grant to address substance abuse problems in Ohio—one of the largest grants ever awarded in the college’s 100 year history.
Congratulations to Drs. Bridget Freisthler, Katie Maguire-Jack  and Susan Yoon who secured the grant, which is funded by the Children’s Bureau of the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
The grant will support regional partnership intervention activities in Ohio’s Fairfield and Pickaway counties to reduce child abuse and neglect among families who have substance use problems. For Pickaway County, 100 percent of substance-involved families were due to opioid (including heroin) misuse, while 58 percent of all substance-involved cases in Fairfield County involved opioids.
As part of the grant, College of Social Work faculty Freisthler (l), Maguire-Jack (r) and Yoon, along with public child welfare administrators, have selected three strategies for the Enhancing Permanency in Children and Families (EPIC) program. The evidence-based or evidence-informed strategies to be included are: (1) family drug treatment court and medication-assisted treatment; (2) peer recovery supporters; and (3) parenting and support for kinship providers. These interventions are intended to holistically provide supports to families involved in the child welfare system due to substance abuse in order to get parents into treatment and increase permanency and well-being for children.
In addition to the College of Social Work, key partners of the project include Fairfield County Job and Family Services (also called Fairfield County Children Services), Pickaway County Job and Family Services (also called Pickaway County Children Services), Pickaway County Juvenile Court and Prosecutor’s Office, Fairfield County Juvenile Court, Berger Health System, OhioGuidestone and Integrated Services.
“We are very excited about this collaborative opportunity and the funding to implement evidence-based interventions for families affected by opioid use in the child welfare system,” said Professor Bridget Freisthler, College of Social Work project lead. “The effects of the opioid crisis on children whose parents are misusing or abusing substances have often been overlooked as solutions have primarily focused on reducing overdose deaths. This award will provide much-needed financial support for services for these children and families.”
EPIC will involve collaboration with a wide range of family-serving agencies, including, child welfare agencies, substance abuse treatment providers, health and mental health agencies, courts, schools, law enforcement, and other service organizations. These professionals will be cross-trained in order to provide better services across systems that interact with these families. This means that child welfare workers will become more knowledgeable and trauma-informed about substance use issues, the peer recovery supporters will understand the child welfare system and processes, the kinship caregiver supporters will understand both the child welfare system and substance use disorders, and the family drug court coordinators and medication assistance treatment providers will have a thorough understanding of child welfare.
“Pickaway County is very excited to partner with Fairfield County and Ohio State with EPIC,” said Joy Ewing, Director of Pickaway County Job and Family Services. “A significant portion of our child welfare caseload involves substance abuse and this grant will provide much needed resources for those families affected by substance abuse.”
Kristi Burre, Deputy Director of Protective Services at Fairfield County Job and Family Services, added “Children traumatized as a result of their parents’ drug abuse are often the invisible victims of the opioid epidemic. It has had a critical impact on our local protective services and our ability to service and manage co-occurring substance abuse and maltreatment concerns with Fairfield County families.”
The College of Social Work has developed a long-standing and deeply ingrained culture of applied research and scholarship that permeates all aspects of its programs, informs its community service and engagement, and contributes to the greater good of the profession, society and the world. This regional partnership opportunity is reflective of its commitment to working with communities around developing solutions for complex problems.
About the College of Social Work
First accredited in 1919, the College of Social Work is the oldest continuously accredited public social work program in the country. The College–through excellence in teaching, research, and service–prepares leaders who enhance individual and community well-being, celebrate difference, and promote social and economic justice for vulnerable populations. The college fosters social change through collaboration with individuals, families, communities, and other change agents to build strengths and resolve complex individual and social problems. As an internationally recognized college, it builds and applies knowledge that positively impacts Ohio, the nation, and the world. The college’s vision is to “embrace difference, seek justice, and be the change.”

For more information about the grant or for interviews, contact:
• Ohio State College of Social Work: Frankie Jones-Harris, Communications Director, at 614-330-2206 or jones-harris.1@osu.edu.

• Pickaway County Job and Family Services Contact: Nick Tatman, Children Services Administrator, nicholas.tatman@jfs.ohio.gov.

• Fairfield County Job and Family Services Contact: Kristi Burre, Deputy Director for Protective Services, Kristi.Burre@jfs.ohio.gov.

 

 

What advice is College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire giving students to start off the 2017 academic school year? Here’s a snippet:

“Value not knowing. If we have another problem in our society today, it’s that too many people are too certain. And frankly, my greatest capacity to be harmful to other people is when I’m absolutely certain. Not knowing is powerful.”

Check out the entire podcast here.

 

 

Congratulations to Dr. Sharvari Karandikar who received The Ohio State University’s Outstanding Advisor Award from the Office of Student Life. Karandikar was honored with this award in acknowledgement of her exceptional leadership for Sankalpa, a registered Ohio State student organization. She has gone above and beyond her duties as an advisor and has helped facilitate growth and development in the group’s members.

At the college, Karandikar serves as an associate professor. She began her career practicing as a social worker for sex workers and victims of sex trafficking in Mumbai, India. During her PhD program in Social Work at University of Utah, and through her work at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in Mumbai and later at the Ohio State University, she has focused her research efforts on issues related to the female sex workers and victims of sex trafficking particularly on gender-based violence, health and mental health issues. Karandikar’s current research relates to sex work and sex trafficking in Asia, egg donation, international gestational surrogacy, medical tourism and its impact on women.

For more information about Karandikar, click here.