Author Archives: Kayla Luttrell

Baton Rouge is home to approximately 25,000 resettled refugees, out of which 7% (i.e. 1,750) are refugees from Africa. As refugees begin their lives in new spaces, they face many post-resettlement challenges. The purpose of this research project was to understand the needs and capacity of African refugees in Baton Rouge to garner community based solutions centered around community priorities.
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Given the increasing mental health risks among Bhutanese refugee women, a year long culturally responsive leadership project was co-developed and co-implemented with young Bhutanese women to: empower young Bhutanese women as cultural leaders, help identify community assets and cultural resources that can serve as protective factors to challenge gender norms, promote mental well-being, and build community resilience among the local Bhutanese community.
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Congratulations to College of Social Work faculty, staff and students who will be presenting at this year’s SSWR conference. Check out who’s presenting and what topics will be covered here.

One out of eight children will experience child maltreatment by the age of 18. Children who experience maltreatment are at heightened risk for many negative developmental outcomes, yet some children overcome the odds and continue to grow and succeed—a phenomenon often described as resilience. There remains a lack of consensus and consistency around the definition of resilience, the characteristics and features of resilience, and factors that may promote or inhibit resilience development.
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The current opioid epidemic has created special challenges for how Ohio’s agencies serving domestic violence (DV) survivors in a residential setting address the needs of survivors with and without opioid addiction. Ohio’s agencies serving DV survivors in a residential setting currently lack state-wide guidance on better addressing the needs of survivors who struggle with opioid addiction while also providing a safe and healing environment. Continue reading

In the College of Social Work Honors Program, outstanding undergraduate students challenge themselves by conducting an independent research project. Congratulations to the 2019 BSSW Honors students and their great accomplishments in research. Continue reading

1 in 8 children are estimated to experience child maltreatment before age 18. Substance abuse—and in particular alcohol abuse—is a likely cause of child maltreatment; interventions to reduce alcohol abuse at the community level might also prevent child maltreatment. Called environmental interventions, intervention activities are designed to reduce supply of alcohol.This study examines whether a program aimed to reduce alcohol use and alcohol availability in neighborhoods—the Sacramento Neighborhood Alcohol Prevention Project (SNAPP) Continue reading

Food for a Long Life had a successful Year 2. Check out their achievements by clicking here. Food for a Long Life promotes healthy food knowledge, access, and consumption among preschoolers and their families in food deserts in Columbus, OH and Lynchburg, VA. More information can be found on their website at u.osu.edu/foodforlife/home.

 

The College of Social Work has partnered with Ohio State’s Colleges of Nursing and Veterinary Medicine to provide care to homebound adults and their pets. The POP (Pet Owner and Pet) Care pilot program is funded through a Hillman Foundation Emergent Innovations grant. It joins the knowledge and service of three academic colleges to transition a pattern of reactive sick care into proactive, holistic well care for homebound adults with multiple chronic conditions. Click here to read complete press release.

The Ohio State University College of Social Work is evaluating Stop to Live, a developmentally appropriate prescription drug use and misuse curriculum designed specifically for students with special needs to learn not to share their prescription medications or use medications prescribed to someone else. Click here to view a PDF with full details.

 

The goal of this intervention is to reduce the number of fatal opioid overdoses within six rural Appalachian counties in southern Ohio: Athens, Gallia, Highland, Jackson, Meigs, and Vinton counties. These counties have been disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis and have more than 19.9% of persons living in poverty. This intervention is designed to further develop an evidence-base of strategies that will reduce and prevent opioid overdose deaths. The goal is that this work can be replicated in additional counties with the same benefit. Continue reading

Although research has been conducted in other professional disciplines, social work has yet to explore how doctoral student debt load influences career development. This exploratory mixed methods study surveyed 281 social work doctoral students and recent graduates, 75 BSW and MSW program leaders, and 24 doctoral program leaders about student debt load, career choices, financial anxiety, and programmatic responses. The companion paper—“Career Implications of Doctoral Social Work Student Debt Load”— was chosen as the JSWE Best Empirical Article Continue reading

There is a limited understanding of how diaspora—the movement, migration, or scattering of people away from an established or ancestral homeland—leads to change in home and host societies. The purpose of this study is to explore the lived experiences of the Nepali diaspora at the intersection of migration, immigration policy, and disaster response engagement in the post-earthquake (2015) and the US post-election (2016) context. Continue reading

Congratulations to Ashley Bennett (MSW 18) and PhD student Karla Shockley McCarthy (MSW 18) who have developed an Opioid Overdose Family Support Toolkit to help families recognize the signs of trauma in children and how to help them.

This toolkit was developed to address a gap from many practitioners about the lack of resources for families, especially children, who have witnessed or were aware of an overdose by a family member. Continue reading

The City of Columbus has always strived to be an open, inclusive, and welcoming city to many New American populations from all over the globe. The New Americans Project was commissioned by the Columbus City Council. The Ohio State University College of Social Work was tasked to conduct an in-depth assessment of needs and capacity of the human service landscape—formal, informal, and volunteer services—available in central Ohio for New Americans to bolster the New Americans Initiative led by the City of Columbus. Continue reading

Preventing infant mortality is a priority in Ohio. Comprehensive positive youth development strategies that address maternal risk factors are needed, not only to promote better outcomes for adolescent girls but also to impact infant mortality. To continue reading, please click on the image or contact Dawn Anderson-Butcher (anderson-butcher.1@osu.edu).

 

 

Enhancing Permanency in Children and Families (EPIC) is a program that uses evidence-based and evidence-informed practices to reduce child abuse and neglect among families involved with the child welfare system who have substance use problems. This program is being developed through a collaboration of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, Fairfield County Job and Family Services, and Pickaway County Job and Family Services. Continue reading

Central Ohio’s 65+ population is expected to double in the next 30 years. This poses a great opportunity for the region to provide easy access to services, amenities, and opportunities to ensure we can all thrive as we age. Age-Friendly Columbus is a project to strengthen the quality of life for people of all ages across Franklin County and Central Ohio. After a year-long research and assessment phase and a year-long strategic planning phase, Age-Friendly Columbus is now in the implementation phase to make changes happen in our community. Continue reading

Congratulations to Dr. Michelle Kaiser whose research was featured by CBS 10-TV, Sunny 95 radio, and other media and websites recently. Kaiser’s research finds that a third of households – double previous estimates – struggle to get enough food in a Columbus area. Check out the video and other story links.  Continue reading

COLUMBUS, OHIO — The Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce that it has received a $3 million grant to address substance abuse problems in Ohio—one of the largest grants ever awarded in the college’s 100 year history.

Congratulations to Drs. Bridget Freisthler, Katie Maguire-Jack  and Susan Yoon who secured the grant, which is funded by the Children’s Bureau of the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Continue reading

As immigrants are a growing part of the Central Ohio community, it is important to identify and educate the immigrant community on the services available to successfully integrate them into our community. In the spring of 2017, the Columbus City Council began discussing new laws that would prohibit arresting or denying public services to immigrants in the city based on their immigration status. CSW will work to analyze what gaps exist in local social-service networks and how they could be filled to best help new Americans, including immigrants and refugees.

Click here to view a PDF with full details.

The Ohio State University College of Social Work will partner with the Ohio Attorney General’s office to evaluate Sobriety, Treatment and Reducing Trauma (START) in 14 Ohio counties affected by the opioid crisis. The CSW will examine what elements are most successful in parents regaining sobriety, maintaining treatment, and reducing future recurrence of child abuse or neglect. Unique to this initiative is a particular focus on improving the well-being of the children affected by parental opioid use. Four CSW faculty members will evaluate Ohio START: Bridget Freisthler, Katie Maguire-Jack, Alicia Bunger, and Susan Yoon.

Click here to view a PDF with full details.