Category Archives: News & Events

“Civil rights is not just a movement, it’s a way of life.”

Spoken by Harry Belafonte, these few words describe the life of Associate Professor Emeritus Charles O. Ross, Jr., the message he lived, and the legacy he left behind. Known for his unwavering battle for civil rights and his outspoken nature, Ross never shied away from activism and confronting those whom he believed were in opposition of advancing civil rights.

Charles O. Ross  head and shoulders jpg format photoIn 2013, Ross was posthumously inducted into the Ohio Civil Rights Hall of Fame.  This distinguished honor acknowledges citizens who have left their mark in the State of Ohio through their tireless efforts in furthering civil and human rights in their communities. This Hall of Fame acknowledges the exemplary leadership through which these citizens have helped eliminate barriers to equal opportunity in Ohio, as well as fosters cultural awareness and understanding for a more just society. Ross championed the Civil Rights Movement in Ohio and other places for several decades.  He had an unswerving fervor for justice and equity.

Read more about the life and legacy of Associate Professor Emeritus Charles O. Ross, Jr.

Columbus, Ohio – The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation has awarded a grant of $2 million to establish The Ohio State University Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Drug Misuse Prevention and Recovery (HECAOD).

The Ohio State center will serve as the premier alcohol and drug abuse prevention and recovery resource for colleges and universities across the nation. The mission of the center will follow that of HECAOD: to help college and community leaders develop, implement and evaluate programs and policies to reduce problems experienced by students related to alcohol and other drug use. HECAOD is a collaboration among Ohio State’s College of Social Work, College of Pharmacy, Office of Student Life, Generation Rx Initiative and Collegiate Recovery Community.

“We are immensely grateful for the support of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation,” said John D. Clapp, director of HECAOD. “In addition to working quickly to provide colleges and universities across the nation model prevention programs that include variations of the SBIRT–Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment—model, we will work diligently to get college alcohol and drug issues back on the national agenda. The resurrection of this critically important center would not have been possible without Conrad N. Hilton Foundation support.”

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CLAPP JOHNCongratulations to Dr. John Clapp, professor and associate dean for research at the College of Social Work, who will serve as co-principal on an OSU Outreach and Engagement Grant. The grant will help establish The Community Technology Clinic, an interdisciplinary collaborative endeavor, serving as a haven within an under-served Columbus-area neighborhood. The clinic will enable the design of novel technological solutions tailored to the needs of community members, provide course-work and research opportunities for faculty and students, and serve as an instrument of change in addressing immediate needs of residents. Ultimately, the goal is for transformational change to occur through improvement of services to neighborhood residents through the innovative application of technology.

In addition, Clapp will serve as co-investigator on a grant from the Battelle Foundation to serve the homeless. The project, “Engineering, Technology, Human Affairs and Social Justice: From Columbus to Colombia” will work to build cross-cultural K-12 STEM outreach in Columbus and Colombia, develop technology for the poor or homeless in Columbus, and develop technology for engineering laboratories in disadvantaged universities in Colombia. Grant partners include The Ohio State University College of Social Work, College of Engineering and Department of Teaching and Learning.

The grant was awarded through the Battelle Engineering, Technology and Human Affairs (BETHA) Endowment annual grant competition, which supports projects that examine the complex relationship between science and technology on society and cultural issues. A central focus of the “From Columbus to Columbia” project will be a first-of-its kind Community Technology Center for an under-served Columbus neighborhood.

Dr. Kevin Passino, professor of electrical and computer engineering, will serve as the principal investigator for the project. In addition to Clapp, co-investigators include Dr. Betty Lise Anderson, professor of electrical and computer engineering; Dr. Leslie Moore, associate professor of teaching and learning, and Dr. Melissa Wilson, project director, Columbus Area Writing Project (CWAP), Department of Teaching and Learning.

“Social work and engineering makes for an interesting and potentially highly effective collaborative approach to social problems,” said Clapp. “As applied scientists, we hope to engage the community in identifying, developing and implementing real solutions to immediate needs.”

For more information, please contact Frankie Jones-Harris at jones-harris.1@osu.edu or Dr. Clapp at clapp.5@osu.edu.

DSC_5330Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny’s research involving equine therapy and Alzheimer’s patients has hit the news! Dabelko-Schoeny was recently featured in the Saturday, May 24, edition of the Columbus Dispatch, interviewed on WCMH-TV (Channel 4), and highlighted in the Huffington Post as well as other media outlets.

In the first study of its kind, Dabelko-Schoeny and co-author Dr. Gwendolen Lorch, of the College of Veterinary Medicine, determined that spending time with horses eases symptoms of Alzheimer’s dementia.

The collaboration also included the Field of Dreams Equine Education Center and an adult daycare center, National Church Residences Center for Senior Health. The research found that people with Alzheimer’s were able to safely groom, feed and walk horses under supervision—and the experience buoyed their mood and made them less likely to resist care or become upset later in the day.

The small pilot study, which appears in the journal Anthrozoös, suggests that equine therapy—a treatment used today for children and teens who have emotional and developmental disorders—could work for adults, too.

Read more or listen to the interview at:

Columbus Dispatch 

WCMH-TV Interview

Huffington Post

 

Photo by Johnny Runciman Photography

 

photo 1Nearly 300 College of Social Work graduates and their friends and families packed out Ohio State’s Mershon Auditorium on Friday, May 2 for the college’s annual Evening of Recognition, an event honoring social work graduates. Momentum soared during the ceremony as students were honored with yellow roses, students, faculty and staff received awards, and live tweets by the graduates and their guests were displayed on a big screen. These were just a few of the highlights from an evening filled with much accomplishment and excitement.

Wish you’d been there or want to relive the moment? Enjoy the spirit of the evening by clicking here.

Two days later, the graduates received their degrees during The Ohio State University’s Spring Commencement. An astounding 10,200 Ohio State students earned degrees and more than half of them participated in the ceremony.Ohio State is one of the few universities where all graduates participate in a single ceremony, and where each graduate gets his or her diploma at the ceremony.

tom.ethiopia

Dean Tom Gregoire and two colleagues from the College of Social Work–Dr. Jacquelyn Meshelemiah (associate professor) and Elon Simms (associate director of Field Education)–visited Ethiopia during spring break. Their focus was on identifying the important role of social work in health care in Ethiopia and helping implement a new graduate curriculum at the University of Gondar. Read Dean Gregoire’s blog about the social work, nursing, and medical faculty and students they met. And of course, there’s always time for an O-H-I-O!