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Monthly Archives: March 2017

DaVonti’ Haynes

Nearly 400 Ohio high school students attended A Day in the Life of a Buckeye, created by a social work student five years ago. Organized and created by MSW student DaVonti’ Haynes, A Day in the Life of a Buckeye gives sophomores and juniors from inner-city and Appalachian area high schools a chance to see what college is really like.

Stacy Song

 

Haynes was inspired to host the event as an Ohio State undergraduate student when he recognized a need to attract more low-income and rural high schools. He partnered with LeRoy Ricksy Jr., an undergraduate criminology and criminal justice student.

 

Both have received Ohio State’s 2017 Distinguished Diversity Enhancement Award, which recognizes up to five recipients for extraordinary efforts.

The college’s Stacy Song, BSSW Academic Counselor and Staff Assistant, participated in the event by speaking to students about the many facets of a social work career and the program at Ohio State. This year’s event was held on March 22, 2017.

News Coverage:

The Lantern
WOSU/NPR
WCMH NBC4

The Ohio State University College of Social Work is pleased to announce its new partnership with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office in the creation and funding of a new pilot program that will help families harmed by parental opioid abuse.

Ohio START (Sobriety, Treatment, and Reducing Trauma) is an intervention program that will provide specialized victim services, such as intensive trauma counseling, to children who have suffered victimization due to parental drug use. The program, to be initiated in 14 Ohio counties, will also provide drug treatment for parents of children referred to the program.

College of Social Work’s Drs. Bridget Freisthler, Katie Maguire-Jack, Alicia Bunger and Susan Yoon will be directly involved in evaluating the effectiveness of Ohio START.

According to the Public Children Services Association of Ohio, 50 percent of children placed in foster care in 2015 were placed due to abuse and neglect associated with parental drug use. Ohio START will bring together child protective services, peer mentors, the courts, and behavioral health and treatment providers to work closely with families whose children have been abused or neglected due to parental addiction in Athens, Clermont, Clinton, Fairfield, Fayette, Gallia, Highland, Jackson, Perry, Pickaway, Pike, Hocking, Ross and Vinton counties.

Child welfare workers will partner with a certified peer mentor to meet with each family once a week to ensure the safety of the child and provide support to parents. If a child can safely stay in the home during this process, the child can do so with the oversight of caseworkers. Otherwise, kids will have regular visitation with their parents as they undergo drug treatment, which will be paid for by Medicaid or private insurance. Family reunification will occur after parents have a minimum of six months of documented sobriety.

As part of their evaluation, College of Social Work faculty will examine what elements of the Ohio START pilot are most successful in parents regaining sobriety, maintaining treatment, and reducing future recurrence of child abuse or neglect. Unique to this initiative is a particular focus on improving the well-being of the children affected by parental opioid use. Expected results are the availability of more substance abuse-related services and resources for families in the child welfare system.

“We are very excited to be collaborating with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office on this important project,” says Professor Bridget Freisthler. “The opioid crisis has been especially harmful to families and young children, yet few counties have the resources to provide additional interventions and services to this vulnerable population. By funding this project, the Attorney General’s Office recognizes that the youngest victims of this epidemic need additional support to enhance their safety and well-being.”

The program will primarily be funded through a $3.5 million Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) grant from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office which will be shared among the counties over two and a half years. These grant funds will be specifically spent to help county child welfare agencies identify children who have been victimized due to parental drug use and provide them with specialized treatment for any resulting behavioral or emotional trauma. The grant will also fund victim services for parents with underlying victimization that may be contributing to their addiction.

Casey Family Programs, which partnered with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office to develop the Ohio START program, is providing an additional $75,000 for the pilot program. Both grants will be administered by the Public Children Services Association of Ohio.

For more information about the pilot, contact Professor Bridget Freisthler at Freisthler.19@osu.edu.

For media inquiries, contact Frankie Jones-Harris, Communications Director at the College of Social Work, at 614-330-2206 or Jones-Harris.1@osu.edu.

READ & WATCH MORE

Ohio Attorney General Press Release

CBS 10-TV News Clip 

ABC 6 TV WSYX News Clip 

FOX 28 News Clip 

Congratulations to Dr. Tamara Davis who has been selected as one of four recipients of the 2017 Ohio State University Distinguished Diversity Enhancement Award. Davis serves as the College of Social Work’s associate dean for academic affairs. The announcement was made on March 27, at PrimaryOne Health, a federally qualified health center on Parsons Avenue in south Columbus. It’s just one of the field sites where Davis’ Medicaid Technical Assistance and Policy Program (MEDTAPP)  Program trains MSW students to provide behavioral health services in an integrated care model to diverse populations living in underserved communities of Columbus.  Many of her students and program staff attended the award ceremony.

“Tamara has been a champion of diversity in the college since she joined its faculty in 2005,” said College of Social Work Dean Tom Gregoire. “This award reflects a career of commitment to diversity, and one that is expressed through teaching, scholarship, and service.”

In addition to the MEDTAPP service, research and training endeavor which has prepared 67 students to work with diverse individuals in culturally relevant practice, Davis is the lead-author of a study that explored the experience of LGBTQ students across all of Ohio State’s campuses. This report made far ranging recommendations that have influenced the university’s current and prior Provost’s effort to create a more inclusive campus community leading to changes in its university physical and cultural environments and curricula.

Davis was nominated by colleagues Adriane Peck and Stacey Saunders-Adams.

“I am truly honored and humbled to receive this award,” said Davis. “I work alongside some really special people who share my commitment to diversity. I thank them for helping to sustain and advance our work towards reducing service inequities and health disparities.”

      Pictured (front row, l to r): Erica Magier, Samantha Bork, Shannan Swaim, Bethany Hill, Courtney Kren. (Back row, l to r): Katie Simpson, Laine Kolesar, Andrew Rielinger, Cory Roth. Not pictured: Ellen Williams, Samantha Larason.

Congratulations to the following BSSW Students who showcased their research at Ohio State’s 2017 Richard J. and Martha D. Denman Undergraduate Research Forum.  Special recognition goes to Ellen Williams who received first place in her category.

 

This year marks the highest number of BSSW students to participate in the Denman at Ohio State. The variety in their research ranged from social reaction to prisoners in the community and eating behaviors of college students, to grandmothers raising grandchildren and barriers to meditation.

 

Presenters and their research titles:

  • Samantha Bork: “Barriers to Meditation”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Bethany Hill: “The Effects of Deployment on Military Family Roles”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Laine Kolesar: “Breaking Down the Barriers to Academic Achievement: Middle School Students”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Courtney Kren: “Student Perceptions of Campus Safety and Physical/Sexual Assault at The Ohio State University”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Samantha Larason: “Social Reaction: Experiences of Former Prisoners and Perceptions of Community Members”; will graduate with Research Distinction
  • Erica Magier: “Eating Behaviors of First Year Students: Transitioning from High School to College”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Andy Rielinger: “Suffering in Silence: Examining Society’s Perception of Intimate Partner Violence”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
    Cory Roth: “Describing the Geographic Distribution of Patients Seen at the Columbus Free Clinic”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
    Katie Simpson: “Caregiver Resilience in Complex, Chronic Care”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Shannan Swaim: “Am I My Child’s Keeper? Grandmothers’ Relationships with Their Children While They Act as Primary Caregivers to their Grandchildren”; will graduate with Honors Research Distinction
  • Ellen Williams: “The Impact of Sport-Based Positive Youth Development Programs in Enhancing Social Competencies Among At-Risk Youth“; Category: Family Dynamics Within Complex Community and Educational Systems; set to graduate in 2018

For more information about the Denman, click here.

What types of job opportunities are available at Nationwide Children’s Hospital? Is there a difference between domestic violence and intimate partner violence? How early should you arrive before an interview?

Answers to these questions and more are just a small sample of what a group of students learned during their visit to The Center for Family Safety and Healing at Nationwide Children’s Hospital on Tuesday, February 21.  College of Social Work students spent a half-day at the center as part of the colleges’ new Learning Journey Program. This unique and engaging program is designed for social work students and pre-majors to tour an agency, discover its mission and meet social workers in that agency to get a better sense of what they do on a daily basis.

At this destination, students toured the facility, listened to an overview about the center and heard invaluable information from human resources recruiters and consultants. A panel, comprised of center coordinators and managers, a psychologist and a Franklin County Prosecutors Office representative, also discussed their roles and how they work together.

“Participating in the Learning Journey was a wonderful experience and I thoroughly enjoyed it,” says Marsha A. Cuveilje, a BSSW student at the college. “It exposed me and the other students attending to the many facets of social work practice and the variety of careers that are available in our field.”

This Learning Journey marks the second visit of its kind. The first was held in October 2016.

For more information about future CSW Learning Journey destinations, contact cswcareers@osu.edu.

College of Social Work faculty members Dr. Sharvari Karandikar and Dr. Katie Maguire-Jack knew that they were working with students and colleagues of diverse identities every day. To reflect this and the college’s commitment to fostering a welcoming environment for everyone, they facilitated the publishing of a new resource on the CSW website, Our Commitment to Diversity.
This page highlights the college’s ongoing effort to hold conversations on contemporary issues such as immigration and racial justice, and to build cultural competency among CSW faculty, staff and students. It is also home to a new Cultural Events Calendar, which features holidays, religious festivals, and cultural celebrations observed by the those studying and working at the university, and in the surrounding community.
Visit the new page documenting Our Commitment to Diversity, and the Calendar of Cultural Events and Holidays.