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Monthly Archives: March 2011

Studies show that thirty percent of all U.S. students grades 6 through 10 are either bullies, victims, or both. On April 1, high school students from the Arts & Preparatory Academy in Columbus presented a human rights play, The Equality Project, at the College of Social Work. This award-winning diversity play about bullying and equality was held from 10 –11:30 a.m. at 100 Stillman Hall, 1947 College Road.

Check out the YouTube preview or click here to hear cast and Dr. Vicki Fitts interviews

An afternoon workshop on creating individualized Equality Projects followed the play from 1 – 4 p.m. For more information, call 614/353-7212. Media calls should be directed to Communications Director Frankie Jones-Harris at 614/292-3540 or 614/330-2206.

 

 

 

 

Over the last few months, College of Social Work’s Dr. Susan Saltzburg, Assistant Professor, has addressed LBGTQ issues on Ohio State’s main and Lima campuses.

 

Over the last few months, College of Social Work’s Dr. Susan Saltzburg has addressed LBGTQ issues on Ohio State’s main and Lima campuses. On Friday, December 3, 2010, Dr. Susan Saltzburg,  moderated a panel addressing LGBTQ youth, discrimination, suicide and the future , entitled “Getting Beyond Bullying, Challenging Queerphobia” presented as a university event held at the Multicultural Center.  Organized in the aftermath of a spate of gay adolescent and young adult suicides in recent months, this event presented a panel presentation on discrimination, suicide, the media response, and social responsibility as it relates to homophobia, transphobia and heterosexism. Saltzburg specifically addressed the social-emotional impact of homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexixm on LGBTQ youth and their families. This panel also included Debra Moddelmog, English and Sexuality Studies, Marc Spindelman, Moritz Law School, Mollie Blackburn, College of Education, Ruby Tapia, Comparative Studies, Women Studies, Latino Studies, Joe Ponce, English, Asian American Studies, Sexuality Studies, and Bowen Marshall, Bias Assessment and Response Team.

 

On Wednesday, February 16, Saltzburg spoke on a panel addressing "The Gay Agenda": Pushback Against the Struggle for Equal Rights in the Gay Agenda,” along with Professor Cynthia Burack, of Women’s Studies. The event focused on the resistance to and future of the LBGTQ rights movement. Particular attention was paid to the history of resistance against equal rights, ways in which LGBTQ individuals and the community as a whole have been harmed by pushback, and ways in which people can prevent and take action against homophobia and bullying. Saltzburg specifically commented on the psycho-social effects of the pushback on the well-being of LGBTQ individuals.

 

On Monday, February 28, Saltzburg also visited the OSU Lima Campus to participate in a panel addressing “Getting Beyond Bullying: Challenging Queerphobia at The Ohio State University.” Organized in the aftermath of a spate of gay adolescent and young adult suicides in recent months, this event presented a panel presentation on discrimination, suicide, the media response, and social responsibility as it relates to homophobia, transphobia and heterosexism. Saltzburg specifically addressed the social-emotional impact of homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexixm on LGBTQ youth and their families.  This panel also included Debra Moddelmog, English and Sexuality Studies, Mollie Blackburn, College of Education, Joe Ponce, English, Asian American Studies, Sexuality Studies.

 

For more information about Saltzburg, click here.

 

 
What:  A rejuvenation celebration!
 
When:  Friday, March 11, 7 a.m. -5 p.m.
 
Where:  Student Lounge (basement) in Stillman Hall
 
Who:   Social work faculty, staff, and students
  • All day: rejuvenation food (bagels, fruit, drinks), candy bags
  • 11 a.m.gather in basement and get T-shirt and hat to begin march around campus
  • 11:30: march from Stillman to oval, through Ohio Union and back to Stillman
  • 12:15: pizza, “imitate your favorite faculty” contest with prizes, karaoke, fun!

Come get rejuvenated! Got questions? Contact kinsway.1@osu.edu.

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

What does poverty look like in America—and even closer to home—what does it look like in Cincinnati, Ohio? Dr. Keith Kilty, Ohio State College of Social Work Professor Emeritus, put a human face on poverty in his eye-opening debut documentary, Ain’t I A Person *with Apologies to Sojourner Truth. As the director, Kilty examined issues ranging from “What is poverty?” to “What it means to be poor” and dispelled many of the myths and stereotypes associated with it. A premiere of the film was held on Thursday, March 31, at 7 p.m., (6 p.m. reception) in the US Bank Theatre at OSU’s Ohio Union. A discussion led by Kilty followed. The premiere was free and open to the public including all OSU and social work alumni, students, faculty, and friends. A non-perishable food donation wasrequested for the Mid-Ohio Food Bank. Two CEUs were available to licensed social workers or counselors who attended. For more information, call 614/292-7686. All media calls should be directed to Communications Director Frankie Jones-Harris at 614/292-3540 or 614/330-2206.

 

To purchase the documentary, contact Keith Kilty at kilty.1@osu.edu.

 

Directions to the Ohio Union, US Bank Theatre:

1739 North High Street

Parking: UNION PARKING GARAGE (Building 162)

Ohio Union South Garage is located immediately adjacent to the north side of the building with access from High Street and College Road. Exit garage via the College Rd entrance/exit. US Bank Theatre will be on your right once entering the Ohio Union building.

 

 

Congratulations to Dr. Theresa Early, of The Ohio State University College of Social Work, who has been awarded a nine-month Fulbright Scholar grant to conduct research with faculty and students at the Autonomous University of Mexico’s National School of Social Work in Mexico City. An associate professor and doctoral program director, Early’s study is titled “Youth as Social Actors: Countering Crime and Improving Neighborhoods in Mexico City.” She is one of approximately 1,100 U.S. faculty and professionals who will travel abroad through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program.

Beginning in August, Early will collaborate with lead investigator Professor Eli Evangelista, a former administrator for the city government of Mexico City, which rivals the national government in funding and programming for human and social services. She will work with him on his current projects about participatory action/youth development in various neighborhoods in Mexico City, in which students and faculty join with youth to identify community improvements from the youths’ perspectives, and strategies and tactics to achieve results.

“I intend to help document what they are doing and work on developing evaluation plans and instruments, both for their local efforts and to make comparisons with similar projects in the U.S.,” said Early. “ From what I have seen, Evangelista’s work is cutting edge and I think we can learn from it.”

To check our Early’s blog, visit http://social-work-mexico.blogspot.com.

For more information about Early, click here or call College of Social Work Communications Director Frankie Jones-Harris at 614/292-3540.

Fulbright History

The Fulbright Program, America’s flagship international educational exchange program, is sponsored by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Since its establishment in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the Fulbright Program has provided approximately 286,500 people – 108,160 Americans who have studied, taught or researched abroad and 178,340 students, scholars and teachers from other countries who have engaged in similar activities in the United States – with the opportunity to observe each others’ political, economic, educational and cultural institutions, to exchange ideas and to embark on joint ventures of importance to the general welfare of the world’s inhabitants. The Program operates in over 155 countries worldwide.

Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement, as well as demonstrated leadership potential in their fields. Among the thousands of prominent Fulbright alumni are: Muhammad Yunus, Managing Director and Founder, Grameen Bank, and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006; Javier Solana, Foreign Policy Chief, European Union; Ruth Simmons, President, Brown University; Craig Barrett, Chairman of the Board, Intel Corporation; Shamshad Akhtar, the first woman to hold the position of Governor, State Bank of Pakistan; Alejandro Jara, Deputy Director-General, World Trade Organization; Raoul Cantero, Justice, Florida Supreme Court; Renee Fleming, soprano; Gish Jen, Writer; Daniel Libeskind, Architect; Aneesh Raman, CNN Middle East Correspondent; and Sibusiso Sibisi, President and CEO, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in South Africa.

Fulbright recipients are among over 40,000 individuals participating in U.S. Department of State exchange programs each year. For more than sixty years, the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs has supported programs that seek to promote mutual understanding and respect between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is administered by the Council for International Exchange of Scholars.

For further information about the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, please visit the website at http://fulbright.state.gov or contact James A. Lawrence, Office of Academic Exchange Programs, telephone 202-453-8531, or e-mail fulbright@state.gov.